St. Charles Day

As you know, Charles Borromeo was a Roman Catholic archbishop and cardinal from Milan in the 1500s. He was a member of a noble family and was Pope Pius IV’s nephew. He died on November 4th, a day that is now recognized as St. Charles Day. St. Charles Borromeo, an Orlando private school, honors its namesake by celebrating with a feast. Here’s how your family can participate in activities that memorialize him.

Eat an Italian Meal
In his memory, cook an Italian meal or visit a local Italian restaurant. POPSUGAR has Italian dinner options that will empower your child in the kitchen. Allow your little chef to assist you with recipes, such as sun-dried tomato pesto pasta, shrimp caprese, and spinach manicotti marinara.

Attend Mass
Attending mass allows you and your child to unite, to receive God, and ask for forgiveness. You and your child can recite the St. Charles prayer:

“Almighty God, you have generously made known to human beings the mysteries of your life through Jesus Christ your Son in the Holy Spirit. Enlighten my mind to know these mysteries which your Church treasures and teaches. Move my heart to love them and my will to live in accord with them. Give me the ability to teach this Faith to others without pride, without ostentation, and without personal gain. Let me realize that I am simply your instrument for bringing others to the knowledge of the wonderful things you have done for all your creatures. Help me to be faithful to this task that you have entrusted to me. Amen.”

Tell His Story
Your child should know the parish saint in which their school is named after. Tell his story and allow his legacy to live on through your child. Catholic Online sells a coloring book that tells the stories of the Saints. It comes in a downloadable digital PDF, a perfect resource that will definitely allow your child to understand his legacy!

Be Inspired
St. Charles spent much of his life dealing with disasters like the plague and famine. In one day, he fed more than 3,000 people. Coordinate a food drive and donate the items to a local food bank. Additionally, St. Charles constantly kept his nose in many books, specifically the Holy Scripture. Read the Bible with your child before they go to sleep or take them to the library to choose new children’s books.

St. Charles Borromeo, an Orlando private school, is more than just a place to learn; it’s a community. Our staff is committed to proclaiming the Gospel Message of Jesus Christ. We believe in teaching the whole child and want students to love learning, helping them grow into well-rounded, contributing members of society. Learn more about us by contacting us here.

International Day of Peace

Peace is more than a feeling or a state of being; it’s a fruit of the Spirit. God-given peace is the kind of peace that transcends understanding and allows us to find peace in any situation regardless of the circumstances. St. Charles Borromeo, an Orlando Catholic School, reflects on the meaning of peace and how to find it in difficult situations.

As we celebrate International Day of Peace, remember why we are even able to experience true peace in the first place. It is best illustrated in the following verse: “I have told you this so that you might have peace in me. In the world you will have trouble, but take courage, I have conquered the world.” — John 16:33

This verse references one of our core beliefs as Catholics, that Jesus has overcome the world by dying on the cross and saving us from our sins. Because of this selfless act, we can experience eternal life and can set our eyes on heaven. This verse isn’t denying that we won’t encounter trouble or hardship, but it reminds us of a greater hope.

How to Have Peace in Difficult Situations
Of course, it is easier to have peace when everything in your life is going well. But what about when life is just plain hard and it doesn’t seem like you can catch a break?

Let Go and Let God
Tough situations that you don’t have control over present the perfect opportunity to strengthen your faith. Remember that God is bigger than any struggle or hardship you face. Surrender to God, and recall all the times He’s come through for you in the past.

Prayer
Our God is a personal God and he sends the Holy Spirit so that we can spend time with him through prayer. We can pray about the tough situations we are in, and pray for the peace the Holy Spirit gives. Philippians 4:6-7 states to not to worry about anything, but instead to pray about everything. God may not always answer our prayers how we’d like, but we can trust Him and His timing.

Worship
Singing is like praying twice. Responding to hardships with worship is unexpected, but it can help call peace over your situation. Under difficult circumstances, let your faith draw you closer to God, and be an inspiration to others. Not only will it deepen your faith, but the faith of the people around you. 

When you have peace within yourself, it’s something that people around you can experience. Start with yourself and then let the peace overflow into your communities. St. Charles Borromeo, one of the Orlando Catholic School, is more than just a place to learn; it’s a community. Our staff is committed to proclaiming the Gospel Message of Jesus Christ. We believe in teaching the whole child and want students to love learning, helping them grow into well-rounded, contributing members of society. Learn more about us by contacting us here.

Gardening With Genesis 1:29


The very first foods mentioned in the Bible came from the Garden of Eden. Adam and Eve ate the ideal diet of plant foods given to them by God.
Genesis 1:29 says “ God also said: See, I give you every seed-bearing plant on all the earth and every tree that has seed-bearing fruit on it to be your foodCatholic schools in Orlando explain the importance of plant foods, its connection to the Scripture, and how you can start your very own garden.

Garden of Eden
The very first diet given to us consisted of plants. A plant-based meal includes fruits, vegetables, grains, legumes, and more. These foods are very often known to be very nutritious and help your child live a longer life. But skip purchasing them at the grocery store — instead, create your own garden at home!


Starting Your Own Garden
Starting your own little Garden of Eden with your little one is a great way to bond and save money on groceries. Getting their little hands dirty is rewarding. But knowing where to begin is difficult. Start small and then let it grow. 

Choose a Spot
First, pick a spot in the yard. All vegetables need up to eight hours of sunlight per day. The space must be flat because it’s both not easy and more time-consuming to work with a sloping garden. 

Clear the Sod and Work the Soil
Once you find your spot, clear the ground by getting rid of the sod covering the area. The more fertile the soil is, the better your food will grow. Residential soil usually needs a boost, so add organic matter, such as compost, dry grass clippings, or decayed leaves. Work the soil by tilling and digging

Choose Your Veggies
Head to your local garden store and start shopping! Choose plants that can adapt to your soil, sunlight, and climate. Here are a few great plants for beginners:

  • Peppers
  • Tomatoes
  • Lettuce
  • Cucumbers


Research which fruits and vegetables tolerate what temperatures. For instance, tomatoes prefer warmer temperatures, whereas kale tolerates the cold. Once they grow, there’s no greater feeling. Imagine the smile on your child’s face when he accomplishes this great goal! Now it’s time to eat!

St. Charles Borromeo, one of the Catholic schools in Orlando, is more than just a place to learn; it’s a community. Our staff is committed to proclaiming the Gospel Message of Jesus Christ. We believe in teaching the whole child and want students to love learning, helping them grow into well-rounded, contributing members of society. Learn more about us by contacting us here.

Get a Little Greener for Earth Day

As Earth Day gets closer, it’s the perfect opportunity to talk to your family about how we can take small steps every day to protect the environment. From grocery shopping to traveling, it’s easy to conserve energy and resources. Take a look at these creative tips to go a little greener every day:

Shop smarter: Purchase from businesses that support eco-friendly and fair trade practices. Don’t be afraid to read labels and ask how something was made or what an ingredient is. Your weekly Publix trip isn’t just a chance to check off your grocery list; it’s a chance to show what you want to see more of in the market.

Proper disposal: If you have chemical-heavy items such as used batteries, old cell phones, or paint thinner, Earth911 can help you find locations near you that accept and recycle all sorts of materials.

Cleaning products: Rather than using paper products to clean, opt for sponges, washcloths, and towels, which are less expensive, reusable, and easily disinfected with hot water. Baking soda and vinegar are also great non-toxic, budget-friendly options! If the vinegar smell bothers you, follow it up with a bit of lemon juice.

The stove: When you use a lid to cover a pot on the stove, you not only boil your water faster, but you can reduce your energy by up to two-thirds. And if you’re able to prepare multiple foods in the same pot, you can save energy as well.

Get recycling: If you go to the America Recycles Day website, you can enter your zip code and join a community-wide recycling event close to you.

Pest repellents: Did you know that coffee grounds are an easy eco-friendly alternative to pest repellents? Sprinkle these around ant-prone areas and you’ll reap the benefits without suffering from toxic fumes.

Use rainwater: Create a simple, DIY rainwater harvesting system to collect water run-off for your lawn and garden. All it takes if a 50-gallon barrel, a filtering screen, and a spigot. You can collect up to 150 gallons with every rainstorm!

When traveling: If you don’t wash your sheets and towels every day at home, why should you do it when you’re traveling? Leave the “Do Not Disturb” sign on your hotel room door to prevent the housekeeping staff from cleaning your room every day, which will help conserve cleaning supplies, water, and electricity.

Power strip: Unplug your electronics when they’re not in use. If it takes too much time to unplug each device manually, use a power strip that can turn off multiple devices at once.

St. Charles Borromeo, a private school in Orlando, is more than just a place to learn; it’s a community. Our staff is committed to proclaiming the Gospel Message of Jesus Christ. We believe in teaching the whole child and want students to love learning, helping them grow into well-rounded, contributing members of society. Learn more about us by contacting us here.

 

The Importance of Holy Saturday

The Easter season and Holy Week are sacred, important times of the year. It’s an opportunity for us to remember the last week that Jesus spent walking on Earth and prepare our hearts for His return. Each day of Holy Week is special, and by understanding the importance of Holy Saturday, we can fully appreciate the sacrifice He made for us.

What Happened on the First Holy Saturday?
Holy Saturday is a day of both joy and sadness as we reminisce on the day that Jesus laid in the tomb. Luke 23:56 mentions that the women returned home “and prepared spices and ointments. On the Sabbath they rested according to the commandment.” Pontius Pilate instructed guards to be posted at the tomb to ensure that the disciples wouldn’t steal His body.

The History
This was the only Saturday on which fasting was permitted in the early days of the Church. In the second century, people fasted for the entirety of the 40-hour period between nightfall on Good Friday and dawn on Easter Sunday. In the reign of Constantine in the fourth century, the tradition of the vigil began.

At dusk, the vigil began with the lighting of the “new fire,” which included a large number of lamps and candles and the Paschal candle. The Paschal candle is made of white wax, marked with a cross and an alpha and omega, and represents leading people out of the darkness and into the celebration of the Easter vigil.

What Happens at the Easter Vigil?
When we celebrate Holy Saturday with the Easter Vigil Mass, we meditate on God’s good works and thank Him for the price Jesus paid. In the early church, Holy Saturday and the vigil of Pentecost were the only days baptism was administered. While we don’t follow that now, the Easter Vigil Mass is still an important night for those who have spent months of preparation to be received through Baptism and Confirmation into the Church.

St. Charles Borromeo, an Orlando Catholic school, is more than just a place to learn; it’s a community. Our staff is committed to proclaiming the Gospel Message of Jesus Christ. We believe in teaching the whole child and want students to love learning, helping them grow into well-rounded, contributing members of society. Learn more about us by contacting us here.

Lent Around the World

When we think of Lent in the United States, we often think of abstaining from meat, giving up something we enjoy, or adding in a spiritual practice. But there’s a huge range and variety of Lenten (and Pre-Lenten) traditions in other cultures! Find out a bit about what the rest of the world enjoys during this Holy season.

Denmark
In Denmark, locals celebrate “Fastelavn” the Sunday before Lent begins. On this day, everyone enjoys eating cream or jam-filled pastries, and children dress up in costumes and beat a barrel filled with candy (similar to a piñata). The two children who successfully break the barrel open are crowned “Cat King” and “Cat Queen.” Believe it or not, this is because the barrel didn’t always hold candy — it used to hold a live cat!

British Isles
Did you know that the British Isles have a long-famous Lenten tradition of eating hot cross buns? The cross marking on the bun symbolizes Jesus’ crucifixion, while the spices in the dough represent His embalming.

Greece
“Kathari Thetera,” or Clean Monday, commences the Lenten season. The Sunday beforehand, people attend a special evening Mass and ask for forgiveness to start Lent with a clean soul. This holiday also signifies the end of a month of carnival celebrations that take place throughout the country leading up to Lent! Clean Monday is a public holiday, and families enjoy the day at the beach or countryside, often flying kites.

Germany
What we know as Holy Thursday, Maundy Thursday commemorates Jesus’ last supper with His Apostles. This day is called Green Thursday (or Grundonnerstag in Germany). There are a variety of speculations as to why this is, but a common one is that since we’ve historically abstained from eating meat, this day is full of green foods and vegetables.

The United Kingdom
Pancake Day, or Shrove Tuesday, is a day to indulge and feast before the beginning of Lent. But it’s not just about eating pancakes — in Britain, locals enjoy pancake races every year! Members of Parliament and the House of Lords compete in an annual charity race around Victoria Gardens, and each contestant must complete a full lap without dropping the pancake out of their frying pan (although many admit to stuffing extra pancakes in their pockets), all while wearing an apron and white chef’s hat.

St. Charles Borromeo, an Orlando private school, is more than just a place to learn; it’s a community. Our staff is committed to proclaiming the Gospel Message of Jesus Christ. We believe in teaching the whole child and want students to love learning, helping them grow into well-rounded, contributing members of society. Learn more about us by contacting us here.

Ash Wednesday

Every year, we gather on Ash Wednesday to receive ashes on our forehead — but do we truly understand the importance of what we’re doing? Learn more about Ash Wednesday and how we prepare for the Easter season and Jesus’s resurrection.

Why Ashes?
Ashes help us remember Genesis 3:19, which tells us that we came from dust, and to dust, we will return. We participate in recognition that we need to repent, turn away from our sin, and be faithful to the Gospel. Ashes serve as a reminder that we are given eternal life through the sacrifice of Jesus.

Where Do The Ashes Come From?
The ashes that mark your forehead come from the blessed palm branches that were used for the previous year’s Palm Sunday Mass. The ashes are sprinkled with holy water and blessed with prayers that are thousands of years old.

The Original Palm Sunday
Palm Sunday marks Jesus’s triumphant entry into Jerusalem, and everyone gathered to celebrate his arrival by waving palm fronds. This was the beginning of the final seven days of Jesus’s earthly ministry.

Preparation
Ash Wednesday signifies our preparation for Holy Week and the resurrection of Jesus. We come to God and ask for mercy, forgiveness, and compassion, and we repent of our sins. By doing so, in 40 days, we are able to celebrate Easter with the joy that God intended!

Ashes in the Bible
Over 40 passages in the Bible associate ashes with grief and mourning. In the Old Testament, people used ashes as a sign of repentance. Daniel 9 says that Daniel “turned to the Lord God and pleaded with Him in prayer and petition, in fasting, and in sackcloth and ashes,” and Job 42 shows that Job repented “in dust and ashes.” The Ninevites did the same when Jonah came to them. In Esther 4, Mordecai learns of Haman’s plan to destroy the Jewish people and tears his clothes, puts on sackcloth and ashes, and “went out into the city, wailing loudly and bitterly.”

Don’t Wash Them Away
In the Middle Ages, ashes were not drawn in a cross on the forehead; they were sprinkled across the head. Now, we leave them on our head as a sign of humility. This is a great opportunity to talk to the people in your life about your faith!

St. Charles Borromeo, a private school in Orlando, is more than just a place to learn; it’s a community. Our staff is committed to proclaiming the Gospel Message of Jesus Christ. We believe in teaching the whole child and want students to love learning, helping them grow into well-rounded, contributing members of society. Learn more about us by contacting us here.

Teacher Spotlight: Mary Anne Patchett

Since 1990, Mary Anne Patchett has been a proud member of the St. Charles Borromeo family. Learn more about Ms. Patchett, her love for teaching, and her passion to transform students into compassionate, responsible leaders of the future.

Where did you grow up?
I was born in Daytona Beach and grew up in Longwood, FL.

What subjects do you teach?
I teach 6th-grade World History, 7th-grade Civics and Government, and 8th-grade U.S. History.

What do you like to do for fun?
In college, I worked in a film lab, so photography is definitely a hobby of mine! Besides that, I love the beach and I love to travel, and it’s wonderful to travel to places that you teach about. A few years ago I went to Greece and to be able to share my experiences with the students is incredibly valuable.

Where have you traveled?
I’ve been to England, Ireland, Italy, and Greece. It’s hard to pick a favorite! They’re all so unique. Egypt is on my list next.

When did you know that you wanted to become a teacher?
Teaching wasn’t a plan until I was maybe in high school or college; it was a slow process! But I found out that it was something that I was good at and really enjoyed. I actually started off teaching elementary school. I’ve only been in middle school for 5 or 6 years, but I taught 5th grade for close to 20 years before this.

What’s your favorite thing about teaching social studies?
I think what’s interesting — especially when we talk about the government — is that it’s constantly changing. When we talk about elections and current events, it’s important that we prepare [students] for the world they’re going to be living in and responsible for. We teach them that they’re going to be important leaders and forces of change.

How do you engage your students in the learning process?
I engage the students by showing them respect and expecting it in return. It’s important that they know that you love them and that you care about who they are as individuals. I try to build relationships with them, and I teach with a loving firmness and mutual respect.

Sometimes they’ll surprise you! And sometimes you have to remind them that they know more than they think, and they shouldn’t underestimate themselves. Their opinions mean something, and they should keep striving for their best.

What do you hope your students take away from being in your classroom?
I hope they’re able to think on their own and problem solve. They’re going to be working in jobs and careers that don’t exist yet, and I want them to know that what I did for them was out of love and respect. Teachers want to see success; teachers want to see our students do well, and that’s my goal.

As a College Park private school, our staff is committed to proclaiming the Gospel Message of Jesus Christ. We believe in teaching the whole child and want students to love learning, helping them grow into well-rounded, contributing members of society. Learn more about us by contacting us here.

Life Lessons From the Bible

There are many lessons we can take from the Bible. These stories teach us about forgiveness, obedience, patience, leadership, kindness, love, and courage, and through them, we discover how we can share the love of God with others.

Humility
The Bible addresses humility in a variety of places. Philippians 2 says that “in humility, [we should] count others more significant than yourselves.” Jesus, although He was the son of God, was born into nothing and offered Himself as a servant and friend to society’s outcasts. Philippians 2 also instructs us to place the needs of others first and to do nothing selfishly.

We can also learn about humility from Moses. In spite of his impressive accomplishments, the Bible describes Moses as “a very humble man, more humble than anyone else on the face of the earth” (Nm 12:3). Moses led the resistance against Pharaoh, triumphed over him, and led the slaves through the Red Sea and the desert to freedom in the promised land. Throughout all of this, Moses stayed modest and humble. He never showered himself in praise or asked others to give him credit for God’s work, and this is important for us to remember.

Courage
“I will go to the king, even though it is against the law. And if I perish, I perish” (Esther 4:16). We can learn a great deal about courage from Esther. Although God placed her in the right place at the right time to save her people, Esther didn’t know that; she had no idea how anything was going to turn out. She spent three days fasting and praying in preparation for her stand, finding her courage in the Lord rather than in her own spirit, and then went bravely — and unannounced — to the King. We learn that by looking for our bravery in God, we can positively affect the lives of those around us. When we are struggling to be courageous, we can encourage ourselves with the words of Psalm 27:1: “The Lord is my light and my salvation; whom shall I fear?”

Compassion
The Bible in Psalm 116:5 tells us that our “Lord is gracious and righteous; our God is full of compassion,” and Colossians 3:12 reminds us that as God’s people, we are to “clothe [ourselves] with compassion, kindness, humility, gentleness, and patience.” Compassion is about more than taking pity on someone or feeling bad for them; compassion should drive us to action. And Jesus models this for us over and over again.

In Matthew 20, Jesus asks two blind men what He can do for them, and they say, “Lord, let our eyes be opened. Moved with compassion, Jesus touched their eyes. Immediately they received their sight and followed Him.” We see a similar occurrence in Mark 1:40, when “a leper came to Him, imploring Him, and kneeling said to Him, “If you will, you can make me clean. Moved with compassion, He stretched out His hand and touched Him and said to him, “I will; be clean.”

Again in Mark 6:34, Mark 8:2, Matthew 9, and Matthew 14:14, scripture tells us that Jesus was moved with compassion for these crowds that were “harassed and helpless, like sheep without a shepherd,” hungry with nothing to eat, and full of the sick and disease that needed His healing hand. Whether it was feeding, healing, providing, or calling others to serve, Jesus’s compassion always led to action. As followers of Christ, we must be the same way.

As a Catholic school in Orlando, our staff is committed to proclaiming the Gospel Message of Jesus Christ. We believe in teaching the whole child and want students to love learning, helping them grow into well-rounded, contributing members of society. Learn more about us by contacting us here.

Teacher Spotlight: Karri Gomez

Even when she was young and living in the tiny town of Ponca City, Oklahoma — a town so small that there wasn’t even a McDonald’s until she turned 13 — Karri Gomez knew exactly what she wanted to do with her life.

“I’ve always wanted to be a teacher. My family was either in teaching, farming, or insurance — there was no in between. My parents, aunts, and uncles were teachers. I’ve always had a natural knack for communication and reaching kids,” said Gomez. “I learned [from my family] at a very early age that teaching was more than giving instruction in a classroom setting: it’s about building confidence and life skills.”

Over the years, Gomez watched her family make a difference in their students’ lives and became inspired to do the same in her future classroom. She believes that every experience you have molds you. She moved around frequently as a child, and those experiences strongly affect her approach to teaching. She’s conscious of how every child feels in her classroom and remembers what she would have wanted as a new student.

“We moved around a lot, and when we moved, I got to experience being the new kid — sometimes good, sometimes bad,” said Gomez. “I had teachers that were empathetic and teachers that weren’t. It really taught me what it’s like for a child to experience being new, and I would never want someone to experience the negative things that I did; I really want them to experience the positive things. I want to create an enriching and engaging classroom where students enjoy the learning process.”

In Gomez’s classroom, she makes the curriculum come alive, whether it’s through solving exciting “classroom crimes” with interactive clues or by sharing funny, relatable stories. You’ll never find her at her desk; she’s constantly involved with her students, joyful as she watches them discover new information.

“I’ll teach any grade level, I love them all! But third grade is so much fun. What’s so amazing about this age group is this is when they start to develop their own voice and personality. They take what they’ve learned and really start to apply it,” said Gomez. “They become more independent and mature learners; they become more advanced readers, writers, mathematicians, and thinkers. We go deeper into topics and the students can relate the content to their personal life and experience. This shows up in their writing and everything becomes more personal. It’s so much fun watching them grow throughout the year!”

Not only does Gomez help students grow academically, but spiritually. At the top of every assignment, each student’s paper is headed with Philippians 4:13: “I can do all things through Christ who gives me strength.” She loves sharing the Word of God with them and loves watching their eyes light up in the faith-filled moments

“As a teacher, I always say a prayer about the class I’m going to get,” said Gomez. “It’s not so much, “How am I going to get through all this material?” It’s, “Open my eyes to what they need. How can I help them? Who needs help academically? Who needs to challenged? Who is lacking in self-confidence?”

Throughout the year, Gomez gets to know each student as an individual and encourages them to push through challenges. It’s important that each child understands how capable they are and that they can always lean on the Lord, because He will always be there for them.

“I never look at what I do as a job; I love working with my students. I love that I get to learn with them. Building a strong rapport with students is the key to a successful learning experience,” said Gomez. “Students have to know they can come to you. You have to be there for [students] and get to know them. They have to know I’m going to help them, be there for them, and cheer them on.”

As an Orlando private school, our staff is committed to proclaiming the Gospel Message of Jesus Christ. We believe in teaching the whole child and want students to love learning, helping them grow into well-rounded, contributing members of society. Learn more about us by contacting us here.