5 Reasons for Students to Participate in Extracurricular Activities

St. Charles Borromeo students tug of war

The best learning happens when children enjoy going to school. While classes can be fun, they are often stressful. Extracurricular activities can help alleviate stress while giving children something to look forward to after class. The best part about these activities is that almost any child can find one that aligns with their interests. Schools have academic clubs, music and art groups, special interest organizations, and, of course, athletic programs. Here are some of the ways these activities help students thrive.

Better Academic Performance

Students who participate in extracurricular activities see school as more than just a place to study. This creates a positive perspective, which leads to more motivation to do well in classes. Participating in extracurricular activities can increase brain function. Children who need to learn songs, routines, lines or sports moves learn how to focus, which in turn helps them achieve academic success. Sports and performing arts can also teach students about endurance and reacting quickly in tough situations. When it comes time to take the big test, these students have the upper hand.

ballet

Broadened Horizons

Students from all grades, learning levels and walks of life can join and thrive in student organizations. Children who participate in these activities have the opportunity to learn about different cultures and perspectives. They can also learn more about their own interests and discover adjacent interests that their new friends have. By going to after school activities full of students with shared interests, children have more opportunities to meet and interact with diverse groups of people.

Sense of Belonging

Feeling like you’re the only one who likes something can feel isolating. Finding and joining a school club can give children a sense of belonging. In at least one way, children have a shared purpose with others in the group. On sports teams, every student plays a specific role. Children learn about all the different roles and how they work together, as well as how their role impacts the team as a whole. Children who feel they belong to a community often have a better sense of identity and better mental health than those who feel isolated.

leadership

Leadership Skills

All extracurricular activities have a leadership structure, whether it’s a special interest group or a team. Students in these groups learn about how leadership roles work and can become leaders within the groups. This may also involve learning a little bit about politics if it’s a popular club that runs elections. Other skills children can learn by participating in extracurricular activities include teamwork, goal setting, problem solving, time management, and public speaking. 

Career Prospects

Your child may not be building a resume or college application yet, but when they do, they’ll be better prepared if they have leadership skills and experience. As students advance in school, they’ll be inclined to continue being involved in extracurricular activities. This looks great on college applications, especially if they showed leadership within the group. If they’re involved in student organizations at a college level, that will be a great boost when they start their careers. 

Children who participate in extracurricular activities have plenty of opportunities to get ahead in life. Our Orlando private school located in the Catholic Diocese of Orlando is more than a place to learn; it’s a community. Our staff is committed to proclaiming the Gospel Message of Jesus Christ. We believe in teaching the whole child and want students to love learning, helping them grow into well-rounded, contributing members of society. Learn more about us by contacting us here.

How Faith Can Benefit Your Child’s Health

boy wearing hat laughing while holding Bible

Children need guidance to get through life, and for many, faith is the perfect guide. Living by rules set in place by a higher authority helps children determine their values, such as compassion and honesty. Feeling at peace and in control helps with both mental and physical health. Faith can benefit children’s health in many ways; here are a few.

A Hopeful Outlook

Faith gives most believers a sense of control over their lives. Those with strong faith feel hopeful and optimistic when they pray and ask God for guidance. They trust that God has their best interests at heart and has a purpose for them. This relationship with God can go both ways. A child experiencing trauma with a limited understanding of scripture may feel punished or abandoned by God. One way to combat this is by listening to your child and helping them open up if they withdraw. You can also point your child to Biblical figures like Job or Joseph, people who experienced loss after loss, but kept their hope rooted in faith.

Better Habits

Christianity emphasizes caring for the physical body as well as the heart, mind and soul. We’re called to be good stewards of our time, talents and resources, and one of the most efficient ways to do that is by practicing healthy routines. Sure, the Bible never explicitly said to make our beds each day, but 1 Corinthians encourages us to do all things in order. Establishing these types of healthy routines gets kids set up to have more time to focus on scripture or, at the very least, feel more empowered in their day to make good choices. 

children with hands in air and teacher

Community Inclusion

Being part of a community, especially one with shared interests and beliefs, has positive effects on mental and physical health. Children who feel like they can trust those around them are more likely to reach out when they need help. People who feel like they’re part of something bigger than themselves are less likely to feel isolated and hide their pain when they’re feeling unwell. This gives them a better chance of healing.

girl praying white background

Connection with God

Those with intense faith benefit from their relationship with God, feeling as though they’re talking with a friend when they talk to Him. Having a positive relationship with God and praying often generally has the same benefits of a close, unconditional friendship. Remind your child that prayers aren’t always answered in the way they might hope, but according to Romans, God is working for our good “in all things.” It’s important to talk to your child about their faith to see how they’re doing and how they view religion as part of their lives.

A positive relationship with faith can help children with their mental and physical health. Our Orlando Catholic school located in the Catholic Diocese of Orlando is more than a place to learn; it’s a community. Our staff is committed to proclaiming the Gospel Message of Jesus Christ. We believe in teaching the whole child and want students to love learning, helping them grow into well-rounded, contributing members of society. Learn more about us by contacting us here.

Teaching Your Child Leadership Skills

child in suit

Every child has the potential to be a leader, but not all are born with natural leadership skills. The good news is that many important aspects of leadership can be taught. As a parent, you’re in a unique position to foster your child’s abilities and help them become the best version of themselves. Here are some of the most important qualities of a good leader and how you can help your child nurture them. 

Patience and Forgiveness

To succeed in life, your child needs to learn to be patient with others. When your kid gets upset at needing to wait on someone or for something, talk about how being patient ultimately helps everyone. Explain to your child that most people who cause harm don’t do so with intent and that all people make mistakes. This will also help your child become more patient with themselves. 

Confidence

Leaders need to be decisive and confident. Even if they’re not always sure about the decision they made, they need to be able to explain why they made that decision. Allow your child to make their own choices, starting small and expanding the scope over time. Let them speak directly to wait staff and cashiers, rather than speaking or ordering for them. This will help boost their confidence over time and help them become independent.

girl playing piano

Creativity

Being a leader involves creative thinking and strategy. Encourage your child in any creative pursuit, whether it’s music, art, writing or a unique method of problem solving. Display art around the house, and play music in the car. Talk to your child about how their favorite movies and video games come to life. 

Negotiation Skills

Your child will get far in life if they learn how to negotiate early on. You can help teach them this important skill. When they request something you’re unsure about, rather than saying “no,” make them an offer so they can make a counter offer. See if you can provide multiple options for them to choose from that will help them accomplish their goal. Children often need to ask for permission, and giving them the option to negotiate will be great practice and make them feel more empowered to act independently.

kids playing soccer

Team Player Mentality

To lead others, your child will need experience being around others in different environments. Find out what they’re interested in, and encourage them to explore group activities that allow them to meet like minded people. If they’re into the outdoors, they may thrive in a Scouting organization. Artistic children may enjoy art clubs, school bands or drama troupes. Team sports are a great option for athletic children because everyone has an important role to play. While leaders need to be independent, they also need to know how to work with others.

The teachers at our Orlando private school know that children are the future and that many of our students are destined to become great leaders. Located in the Catholic Diocese of Orlando, our school is more than a place to learn; it’s a community. The staff is committed to proclaiming the Gospel Message of Jesus Christ. We believe in teaching the whole child and want students to love learning, helping them grow into well-rounded, contributing members of society. Learn more about us by contacting us here.

5 Fun Family Ideas for Labor Day Weekend

open road labor day

On the first Monday of every September, Americans celebrate the accomplishments of workers with a day off from work and school. This time off can be a great opportunity to bring the family together. Whether your family craves outdoor adventure or sees home as their happy place, there are plenty of activities everyone can do. Here are some ideas for quality time over Labor Day weekend. 

Road Trip

For family bonding, there’s nothing quite like spending several hours on the road together. When planning your adventure, pick a place that would be fun for everyone, or reach out to a relative you haven’t seen in a while. Find roadside attractions along the way. Prepare for several stops, especially if you have young children. You’ll also need ample breaks to stretch your legs and fuel up. Pack plenty of snacks and forms of entertainment. Plan out who is driving when, and book overnight accommodations ahead of time so you don’t end up sleeping in the car.

Backyard Camping

Camping in the woods with no electricity or running water is an option, but it may be intense for some, especially children who don’t yet understand the romantic notion of getting away from it all. Backyard camping has some elements of camping without the difficult parts. To begin your “camping trip,” pitch a tent in the backyard with plenty of towels, pillows and blankets. Start a campfire for cooking s’mores, hot dogs, or other camping treats. Don’t forget to bring stories to tell around the campfire. Just make sure to fully extinguish the fire at the end of the night. 

drive in movie

Drive-in Movie

Give your child a blast to the past by going to a drive-in movie theater. In one of these nostalgic venues, your family can enjoy sodas, snacks and big silver screens without ever having to leave the comfort of your car. Find a theater that’s showing child-appropriate movies, and get the family together for a short road trip. If the nearest drive-in theater is too far away, and the weather’s nice, consider a movie in the park as an alternative. 

Find Local Events

If all this planning sounds like a headache, hop onto someone else’s event. Labor Day parades, outdoor markets and other fun activities could be happening right around the corner. Check Facebook events or the calendars on local newspaper and radio station websites to see what’s going on around town. Make sure the event you choose is child-friendly and something your child will enjoy just as much as you do. 

decorate for fall

Decorate for Fall

Decorating for every season can be tiring when you’re doing it alone. See if you can make this ritual into a family activity. Create crafts as a family to place on the table, hang on the walls and display on the porch. If your family isn’t crafty, go on a family shopping trip where each person picks out their favorite fall items. Decorate the house together in sections over the course of the weekend so everything will be done in time to ring in the fall season.

Three-day weekends (or in the case of St. Charles, a four day weekend!) create perfect opportunities for family bonding, which is crucial for child development. Our Orlando private school located in the Catholic Diocese of Orlando is more than a place to learn; it’s a community. Our staff is committed to proclaiming the Gospel Message of Jesus Christ. We believe in teaching the whole child and want students to love learning, helping them grow into well-rounded, contributing members of society. Learn more about us by contacting us here.

7 Tips for Teaching Children About Respect

child returning an elbow bump

In order to thrive in life, children need to know about respect. Children who understand how and why to respect others will carry those lessons on throughout their lives. Phrases like “because I said so” teach children the wrong lesson by making obedience feel like a punishment. Before your child goes out into the world on their own, try following these tips to teach them about the benefits of respecting others. 

Demonstrate Respect

Children learn best when they follow a trusted adult’s lead. Be kind to others, especially when you’re around your child. If you slip up in front of your child, talk to them about why that was a mistake and how you could have handled it better. Do the same if they get flustered and act a little rude. Always be forgiving, thinking of mistakes as learning opportunities.

Tell Them Why

Make it clear what you expect of your child, and help them understand why being respectful matters. Demonstrate how respect can improve both sides of any relationship they have. People like to be respected, and it feels good to make others happy. On the flip side, tell them how rudeness or lack of respect can reflect poorly on them and have negative consequences.

Teach Polite Language

The earlier your child learns words like “please” and “thank you,” the more likely they are to incorporate the words into their daily vocabulary. Use polite words often when talking to your child and talking to others around your child. Encourage your child to do the same. Say “please” and “thank you” in every appropriate situation so your child understands the positive effect these words have.

happy family at breakfast table

Practice as a Family

Get everyone in the immediate family involved in teaching your child or children manners, and the lessons will be more likely to stick. The dining table is a great place to start, since many things, like not talking over each other and arriving on time, can be demonstrated over family dinner. Everyone in the family can work together to teach each other respectful habits, keeping in mind that signs of respect vary across cultures.

Don’t Force It

Friendly reminders to say “please” and “thank you” and listen attentively are fine. However, it’s not fine to chew your child out every time they forget. The more aggressively you present the idea of respect, the more likely your child will be to resist. You can’t force your child to learn how to respect others overnight, so use these opportunities to set a positive example.

Let Books be a Guide

Find books that are appropriate for your child’s reading level with themes of respect and kindness. Children’s books often have a “moral of the story,” and some books take on these subjects directly. Talk to your child about the characters in the story and how being kind helped them. The more examples your child has, the easier it will be for them to relate to these concepts. 

statue of Jesus with blue sky in background

Use Jesus as an Example

Jesus demonstrated kindness and respect to those who were often looked down upon. He didn’t hesitate to dine with people who weren’t conventionally “good.” He broke down boundaries by preaching to people of different races and healing lepers, which was unheard of in His time. As He hung on the cross, He begged that those who hurt Him be forgiven. Even today, Jesus can be a model of respect and tolerance. 

Respecting others is the first step to becoming a successful, well-liked person, which is one of many reasons why we encourage it in our students. Our Orlando private school located in the Catholic Diocese of Orlando is more than a place to learn; it’s a community. Our staff is committed to proclaiming the Gospel Message of Jesus Christ. We believe in teaching the whole child and want students to love learning, helping them grow into well-rounded, contributing members of society. Learn more about us by contacting us here.

Helping Your Child Deal with Social Reentry

children packing food donations

Even if your child was a social butterfly before the pandemic, they might struggle to go back to full classrooms and events without social distancing. They could also be starting to make up for lost time with friends and family. These sudden changes can be overwhelming.  Here are some ways you can help your child deal with them.

Have an Honest Conversation

Your child might be nervous about facing large crowds, even if they’re excited about things going back to normal. They may feel brave until the moment they see the full classroom or notice how cramped a gym locker room can feel. This is a great opportunity to open up a dialogue with your child. If you’re also nervous about reentering crowded situations, talk through it. Maybe you can navigate it together. On the other hand, if you’re not nervous, be understanding with your child, and try to pass on some of that bravery.

crowded outdoor market

Prepare Your Child

Learn as much as you can about the policies at your child’s school, especially ones that will change in the upcoming school year. Will masks be required? Will the school still provide virtual options for vulnerable children? Tell your child everything you know to help prepare them for what’s ahead. Your child may have trouble understanding how things that were considered dangerous earlier this year are safe now. Walk them through it as much as you can, and try to answer all their questions.

Ease Into It

Help your child ease in by starting with small crowds. Find events that they’ll be excited to attend. If your child has trouble engaging with others after a year of online interactions, wait until you’re alone, then talk about it. Don’t embarrass them in front of their friends and family; you can’t bully your kid into bravery. They dealt with a lot of change over the past year, so it makes sense that they would forget about social graces. 

alarm clock on table

Get Back into a Routine

If you’ve been working from home for a while and are finally reentering the office, there are a few things that might feel new again: commuting, planning meals, or spending the day in the office. The same goes for your child. To get your child used to getting ready for school and doing after school activities, establish daily routines at home. Make sure your child wakes up early and doesn’t stay up too late. Plan meals on a schedule that works for the whole family. When your child gets back into a flow, encourage them to try new activities so they have something fun to look forward to.

Children may need help adjusting to the changing world around them, and parents are in a great position to help. Our Orlando private school located in the Catholic Diocese of Orlando is more than a place to learn; it’s a community. Our staff is committed to proclaiming the Gospel Message of Jesus Christ. We believe in teaching the whole child and want students to love learning, helping them grow into well-rounded, contributing members of society. Learn more about us by contacting us here.

5 Tips for Summer Water Safety

pool lifeguard water safety

When the weather heats up, it’s natural for children to want to take a dip in the water to cool off. While most adults can easily find their way through bodies of water, children need a little extra help. Drowning is a serious concern, especially when children find their way into water without supervision. Here are our recommendations for keeping your child safe around water this summer.

Pay Attention

In a perfect world, every pool and beach would have attentive lifeguards on duty at all times. However, this simply isn’t the case. Whenever your child gets in the water, whether it’s an inflatable pool or an ocean, stay vigilant. Make sure you know your child’s location and pay attention to how they’re handling the water. If you have a pool in your home and can’t find your child, check the pool first. Paying attention to your child’s swimming habits could save their life.

swimming children in pool with sunglasses

No Swimming Alone

When you’re busy and your child wants to go swimming, you may be tempted to let them go alone. However, anything from cramps to overconfidence in swimming ability can create a dangerous situation. See if they can find a buddy to go to the pool with if you’re not able to go. While a friend or sibling may not be as strong as an adult, they can at least call for help. Tell your child and their buddy who to call in the case of an emergency.

Swim Lessons

One way to help your child stay safe is by teaching them how to swim. By taking swimming lessons, your child learns how to stay afloat and hold their own in the water. Swim instructors make sure your child swims with proper form and technique. Lessons alone will not keep your child safe from harm, but they can help your child confidently navigate the waters under normal circumstances. No child is too young to learn to start swimming; even infants can take water exposure classes and get familiar with bodies of water.

boy with life jacket paddle boarding on lake

Life Jackets

When your child is just learning how to swim or going on an outdoor adventure near the water, wearing a life jacket can quite literally save their life. These are especially important when riding on boats or going near large bodies of water where it’s not always easy to keep track of your child. Children are naturally curious, which can get them into trouble. Life jackets aren’t a substitute for watching your child; they are an added layer of protection. Floaties can help children who are just learning to swim but are not replacements for life jackets.

Know What to Do in an Emergency

Telling your child what to do in an emergency can help keep them safe. However, it’s equally important that you know what to do if something goes wrong. Here’s what you should do in the event of an emergency:

  • Alert the lifeguard if one is available to help.
  • If no lifeguard is present, remove the person from the water if you can do so without putting yourself in harm’s way.
  • Ask someone to call emergency services. If you’re alone, provide 2 minutes of care, then call. 
  • Use rescue breathing, CPR and an AED if available.
  • Signs a swimmer needs help: 
    • They’re not moving forward in the water.
    • They’re vertical in the water and can’t move.
    • They’re motionless and face down in the water.

During summer break, children in Florida naturally gravitate toward the water. It’s important to keep them safe when they do. At St. Charles Borromeo, teachers work hard to guide students toward academic and spiritual growth. Our Orlando private school located in the Catholic Diocese of Orlando is more than just a place to learn; it’s a community. Our staff is committed to proclaiming the Gospel Message of Jesus Christ. We believe in teaching the whole child and want students to love learning, helping them grow into well-rounded, contributing members of society. Learn more about us by contacting us here.

Support a Local Orlando Business on National Ice Cream Day

ice cream cone with pink background

Ice cream is essential for getting through Florida summers, especially for kids (and kids at heart)! On National Ice Cream Day — Sunday, July 18th — ice cream shops go all out with special flavors and deals. One great way to celebrate this holiday is by supporting local businesses here in Orlando. Here are a few great options that aren’t far from our Orlando private school: 

The Greenery Creamery 

The Greenery Creamery, an Asian-owned ice cream shop, calls itself “Orlando’s first artisanal ice cream boutique.” With a variety of locally sourced dairy and plant-based ice cream options, you’re sure to find flavors you and your child enjoy. If you have adventurous taste, this is the place to go. While flavors like sweet cream and cookies and cream can be found, there are also options like guava, blueberry lavender and black ash coconut. You can find this shop at their original Downtown Orlando location or at their newer location in Downtown Sanford. 

 

 

woman in pink apron handing ice cream cone

Kelly’s Homemade Ice Cream 

Another great handcrafted option in Orlando is Kelly’s Homemade Ice Cream, with locations in Audubon Park, Fern Creek and Oviedo. All of their ice cream is handmade in Orlando. This ice cream shop offers classic flavors like chocolate and strawberry, as well as fun flavors like maple bourbon bacon and rose almond pistachio. In addition to their staple flavors, they have a rotating special menu that includes non-dairy options. 

ice cream in bins

Sperry Deli & Creamery 

Named after Orlando Mayor Frank Ezra Sperry, who served in the early 1900s, Sperry Deli & Creamery recently opened in Thornton Park near Lake Eola. This deli serves Boars Head products and a variety of ice cream flavors. Most of the flavors fall under the typical ice cream shop repertoire. Along with ice cream shop favorites like vanilla, chocolate, cookies and cream and cookie dough, they offer sorbets and low-fat flavors. This is a great place to go if you’re looking for a plain and simple ice cream experience.

purple popsicles on pink background

The Pop Parlour 

While The Pop Parlor is not an ice cream shop per se, their popsicles are perfect for cooling down on a summer day. Along with homemade popsicles, they offer specialty coffee drinks and tea, so there’s something for everyone. Like The Greenery Creamery and Sperry Deli & Creamery, The Pop Parlor started in Downtown Orlando, right next to Lake Eola. It has since expanded to UCF and will soon be opening a Texas location. 

At St. Charles Borromeo, we emphasize the importance of service to the community, which includes supporting small businesses. Teachers work hard to guide students toward academic and spiritual growth. Our Orlando private school located in the Catholic Diocese of Orlando is more than just a place to learn; it’s a community. Our staff is committed to proclaiming the Gospel Message of Jesus Christ. We believe in teaching the whole child and want students to love learning, helping them grow into well-rounded, contributing members of society. Learn more about us by contacting us here.

Motivating Children and Teens During Summer Break

teen girl having waffles for breakfast

School’s out for summer, and suddenly there seem to be infinite hours to fill. Some children try to sleep the boredom away, while others look forward to spending quality time with their screens. Keeping children and teens motivated during summer break may feel like a chore, it’s far from impossible. Just like adults, children sometimes just need an extra push to get motivated. Here are our recommendations. 

Decide on a Daily Schedule

Planning out a child’s entire summer will be met with groans. However, it’s important to keep them on a regular daily routine. Setting approximate wake-up times, mealtimes and bedtimes can keep them on track without being overbearing. Make sure the times are age appropriate, keeping in mind that teenagers naturally stay up longer and go to sleep later. See if you can incorporate physical activity each day, even if it’s just a short walk. Try to find a balance between structured activities and downtime. This will help your child keep up healthy habits while still giving them a much-needed summer break.

dart board with dart on outside

Help Them Set Goals

Setting goals is essential to staying motivated. Your goals for summer might be to lose a few pounds, read a few books or clean up the cluttered garage. Consider goals for your child that will keep them focused on the future. For younger children, goals like reading at the next grade’s reading level or learning a new sport would be great. For teens, maybe this is the summer they learn to drive or get their first summer job. Help your child set actionable goals, and walk them through the steps to complete them. 

Try a Summer Job or Volunteering

Whether it’s paid or unpaid, working in a structured environment is a great opportunity for older children and teens. It gives them a purpose when they’re not going to class every day. Working helps improve communication skills, build work ethic and develop leadership skills. Either type of job will look great on a college application or resume. If your child has passions for certain causes, help them find volunteer opportunities. If they’re looking to fund hobbies, a paid summer job may be a better fit.

happy young family outside

Plan for Family Time

Whether you’re keeping it local or traveling to see other family members, spending time with your child will help them focus. Come up with screen-free plans and outdoor activities everyone can do together. Make sure to keep your child posted and, if they’re interested, see if they want to be involved in the planning. Activities like camping, riding bikes or going to the park, pool, beach together can be fun and safe to do as a family. 

At St. Charles Borromeo, teachers work hard to guide students toward academic and spiritual growth. Our Orlando private school located in the Catholic Diocese of Orlando is more than just a place to learn; it’s a community. Our staff is committed to proclaiming the Gospel Message of Jesus Christ. We believe in teaching the whole child and want students to love learning, helping them grow into well-rounded, contributing members of society. Learn more about us by contacting us here.

5 Ways to Help Children Find Their Faith

teen girl holding bible

Helping your child learn about and understand the impact of faith on your life will allow it to become a positive force in theirs. There are many ways to help your child find their faith, and some are more effective than others. Here are a few ways we recommend guiding your child on their faith journey. 

Create a Positive Faith Environment

When it comes to learning about faith, children need guidance. Truly understanding how faith can become part of their lives starts with a positive environment. Think of yourself as a leader, not a boss. Encourage your child to join youth groups, Faith based camps and Bible studies so they’ll be surrounded by peers who can talk about faith with them. When they’re struggling, help them turn to prayer for answers. 

mother and teen girl in fruit field

Communicate in a Loving Way

Spend meaningful time with your child so they know they’re a priority in your life. This will earn your child’s trust and make them more likely to listen to what you have to say. Rather than asking questions that provoke one-word answers, try asking “What was the best part of your day?” or “How did you help someone today?” If your child trusts that you have their best interest at heart, they’ll open up to you when they need extra help.

Set a Good Example

One way to teach your child to become a follower of Jesus is by exhibiting Christlike behavior. It may be tempting to air out your frustrations with someone when you think your child is not listening. However, they’re probably listening to you more often than you realize. Treat children, family members and friends with respect, and encourage your child to do the same. Be forgiving, especially when you’re talking to your child. While leading by example is great, it’s also helpful for them to have multiple sources that show how to behave. Consider finding children’s books, movies and other media that promote positive character building. 

woman and red haired boy at desk looking at computer

Help them Understand

In today’s world where everyone has information at their fingertips, “because I said so” no longer flies. Don’t just tell your child what the Catholic religion is trying to teach if they have questions. Help them understand. Show them that helping the poor, homeless, disabled and oppressed improves the world while enriching their lives. Help them understand why attending Mass helps them connect with their faith. Rather than just telling them to be polite, explain how being polite helps them see with a positive lens and brightens others’ days. If they understand why they’re acting a certain way, they’ll be more inclined to continue on their path.

Consider Catholic Education

For some children, Catholic education provides necessary guidance for faith exploration. Being around like minded peers who have the same questions they do can have many benefits. Teachers, families and staff at Catholic schools work together to provide a positive faithful environment. Children can join a faith-filled community and learn the importance of service to others. Mass is available at school, and parents are encouraged to join. These are just a few ways that Catholic education can help students find their faith.

At St. Charles Borromeo, teachers work hard to guide students toward academic and spiritual growth. Our Orlando Catholic school located in the Catholic Diocese of Orlando is more than just a place to learn; it’s a community. Our staff is committed to proclaiming the Gospel Message of Jesus Christ. We believe in teaching the whole child and want students to love learning, helping them grow into well-rounded, contributing members of society. Learn more about us by contacting us here.