Catholic Schools Week Returns to St. Charles Borromeo

 

It’s that time again — time to come together with our families to celebrate Catholic Schools Week, Jan. 29 – Feb. 4! This year’s theme is “Catholic Schools: Faith. Excellence. Service.” These three essential aspects of Catholic school help build our culture and prepare our students to become faithful stewards in school and beyond. This year, we will reunite once again with Bishop Moore High School students, faculty and staff to celebrate Mass as one community in Christ. Learn more about why we’re excited about this year’s celebration of all things Catholic school.

Catholic Schools and COVID-19

Sending your child to Catholic school can benefit them in a number of ways. However, one way that these schools truly stand out is how students performed during the pandemic. While public schools saw dramatic decreases in test scores over the past few years, Catholic students’ scores stayed about the same. Where public school students fell behind, Catholic school students continue to excel. We believe the reasons for that are clear. 

Catholic schools embraced hybrid models earlier than their public school counterparts, allowing students to learn in a community environment during an otherwise isolated period. With smaller class sizes, which are proven to lead to higher student achievement in normal times, they had a unique ability to adapt to the unprecedented circumstances 2020 brought with it. 

Throughout the difficult times, children, teachers, faculty and staff remained focused on faith, keeping the school community strong. Students had lunch together outside and masked up and socially distanced indoors. With hybrid classes, some students learned online while others came to the classroom, allowing them to safely attend school together. 

Parental Involvement

Part of what made adapting possible was the involvement of everyone in the Catholic school community, including the parents. Parental involvement in education benefits children in many ways, from inspiring confidence to knowing that someone has their back. Parents of Catholic school students see the benefits of their children having good role models in our staff members, daily exposure to our Catholic faith, and the highest quality private school education. 

Catholic Schools Week provides time for parents who are considering a Catholic education to attend open house sessions to explore our community. For parents of current students, we also have several fun activities planned! All are welcome and encouraged to attend this celebration of all things Catholic school. 

Faith

Our students “work hard, play hard and pray hard.” The foundation of an enriching Catholic education is learning about our faith and understanding its importance in living our daily lives, woven into everything they do. Students come together to attend Mass weekly in addition to participating in daily prayer. Nurtured throughout their Catholic education students gain a deep understanding that our Lord walks with them always; providing peace and sowing the seeds for them to become more Christ-like in their involvement with others. 

Excellence

Catholic School students excel in educational growth as a direct result of their faith being underscored in their studies. They offer smaller class-size and high-quality education. The National Catholic Educational Association reports a 99% graduation rate from Catholic high schools with 88% of those students moving on to college. On national and standardized tests, Catholic school students are high achievers, in the forefront by as much as 20% in outperforming other students who attend other private or public schools.

Service

Building a sense of community is one of the core values of Catholicism, and Catholic Schools Week sheds light on the importance of being of service to others as one of the most important tenets of our Catholic faith. At St. Charles Borromeo, students are encouraged to be involved in service projects so they learn teamwork while working on a common cause. 

Our parents are also invited to participate in P.A.W.S., a parent volunteer program established to reach out to help everyone in our Orlando community. Catholic Schools Week gives us a chance to step away from our normal routines by engaging in some fun activities and welcoming families to campus who are considering becoming part of our community. 

St. Charles Borromeo, an Orlando Catholic school located in the Diocese of Orlando, is more than just a place to learn; it’s a community. Our staff is committed to proclaiming the Gospel Message of Jesus Christ. We believe in teaching the whole child and want students to love learning, helping them grow into well-rounded, contributing members of society. Learn more about us by contacting us here.

Getting a New Start in the New Year

Getting back into the swing of things can be very challenging for children after Christmas vacation. We understand the anxiety that faces our students as they return to their studies. As parents and educators, our goal is to help them transition smoothly and successfully while continuing to develop better study habits, enhancing their skills, and cultivating their Catholic faith. Here are some ways you can help your child get a fresh start in the new year.

New Start on Study Habits

Children love routines, but that doesn’t mean the routine can’t be refreshed. To help your child get into the right mindset, consider updating your child’s study and homework area. It doesn’t have to be anything major – it could be as simple as a new set of pencils and crayons, post-it notes or colored file folders! Consider switching up the rules about when homework needs to be done and when your child can enjoy an afterschool snack so they can stay fueled and focused. 

This may involve changing up your own habits, too. Regardless of how busy life becomes, if your child asks for help after attempting a task, guide them through how to solve the problem. You may be tempted to just give them the answer to save time and frustration, but that doesn’t help them learn to independently problem-solve. 

If the first semester was difficult for your child, talk to them to find out why. Many young students need to be encouraged to read, which can create challenges as they advance in grades. Others may not understand number sense without a little extra help. Help where you can, and if needed, find your child a tutor who specializes in the subject where they’re falling behind. 

New Focus on Faith

At St. Charles Borromeo, faith is interwoven into daily classroom activities and curriculum. Developing your child’s faith is central to our mission, and having your parental support at home is essential. In the New Year, remember the promise made at your child’s Baptism. Commitment to helping your child grow and deepen their faith is a life-long responsibility. 

Pray as a family. Start your day at the breakfast table in prayer, say prayers in the car on the way to school or pray at the dinner table before you eat. Attend Mass as a family. Get everyone involved in a family service project for the betterment of others. Be an example of Christ-like behavior for your children. Read bedtime stories together, and pray together every night. Tie this into what the next day at school will bring to help them prepare for their studies.

St. Charles Borromeo, an Orlando Catholic school located in the Diocese of Orlando, is more than just a place to learn; it’s a community. Our staff is committed to proclaiming the Gospel Message of Jesus Christ. We believe in teaching the whole child and want students to love learning, helping them grow into well-rounded, contributing members of society. Learn more about us by contacting us here.

How to Be More Mindful During the Holidays

As they enter the Advent Season and make preparations to celebrate the birth of our Savior, families often find themselves being pulled in a million directions. With all the trappings of the bustling holiday season, it’s easy to lose focus on what this time of the year is really about. If parents are feeling anxious and stressed at this time of the year, rest assured that kids are, too. So, how do we slow down and become more in-tune with our own thoughts and our children’s? 

Mindfulness

Mindfulness is being present in a moment, aware of our surroundings, feeling our emotions and being at peace. Parents can find mindfulness in the midst of all the holiday madness. Their calm and centered mannerisms will help their family find mindfulness too. The end goal is to purposefully slow down and be grateful for the blessings we already have. There are many ways to find mindfulness, and you’ll need to explore different methods until you find what works best to give you the calm you seek to make it through the holidays. Prayer is always a great place to start when you’re looking for ways to be more mindful and present.

Journaling

Some people find that 15 minutes a day of writing their thoughts down, especially things they are grateful for, helps them to renew the soul, and centers them for the day. The physical release from writing provides calm and mindfulness, and taking time to think about the things that mean the most can help move the needle in a positive direction. Your child can spend this time thinking about everything God has blessed them with in their lives, thoughtfully reflecting on their lives and the lives of those around them.

Regulated Breathing

You may be skeptical when told that you can practice breathing. However, regulating your breathing can help you stay calm, even in stressful situations. Yoga is a great way to learn to control breathing. If you find that stillness keeps you calm, sit somewhere that you won’t be interrupted (there’s always somewhere in the house) and close your eyes. Concentrate on your breathing, and focus your thoughts on what you are most grateful for. Counting the seconds of your breath can help you breathe more deeply and release stress. 

Get Outside 

When you’re feeling stressed and have been inside all day, going outside can help. Perhaps take a walk and really listen to the bird songs, the rustle of the wind in the trees, or the crash of the ocean on the shore. Simply spending a few minutes per day being mindful can restore balance in your life. Think about what’s truly important, and learn to appreciate the little opportunities that occur daily.

Read 

Whether you read the Bible or have a favorite inspirational author, take 15 minutes a day to read and seriously contemplate what you’ve read. Words are powerful and can help you establish mindfulness while planting a seed you can share throughout the day. As long as you’re reading something that makes you happy or calm, taking time out of your day to read will help you slow down and improve your mood.

Make it a Family Thing

As parents, we want nothing more than for our children to be healthy, happy and to know God’s love. Modeling mindfulness to them is an important part of this. Any of the above suggestions can be adapted for children, encouraging them to take the time to slow down and be more mindful of their family, friends and self. 

Spending time as a family engaging in traditions and explaining the history is a great way to introduce mindfulness into this crazy time of year. Bake cookies together, set a table together, take turns saying a prayer of thanksgiving each night before bedtime. Remember if you are mindful, your children will sense it and react accordingly. 

Our Orlando Catholic school, located in the Catholic Diocese of Orlando, is committed to proclaiming the Gospel Message of Jesus Christ. We believe in teaching the whole child and want students to love learning, helping them grow into well-rounded, contributing members of society. Learn more about us by contacting us here.

Helping Your Child Become a Better Writer

The written word is one of the most important forms of communication in the world. Helping your child become a better writer is a key component of a successful education, regardless of the subject. At our Orlando Catholic School, we understand the importance of cultivating writing skills in our students and want to share some tips to help our parents supplement their child’s development of these skills.

Encourage reading

Children who love to read are prone to be good writers. When your child observes that you read often and enjoy it, they are more apt to model your behavior. Understanding the written word, experiencing different styles of writing, etc., are crucial components to developing great writing skills, and it starts young. Babies who explore books and are read to are more likely to enjoy reading and subsequently develop good writing habits.

Don’t write it for them

It’s hard to watch your child struggle with sentence formation and developing a storyline. Instead of dictating what they should be writing, ask questions to guide them through their thought process. Where did your story take place? Who was in your story? What did he or she do? Ask basic questions to help them learn independent thought and creativity. If they get stuck, ask more questions. They’ll get there on their own. 

If your child loves to regale you with the events of the day, it’s OK to jot down notes as a guideline and ask them to write it all down in story form. You’ll be surprised at how much they enjoy storytelling on paper, and at the same time they’ll be learning how to develop an outline for a story.

Suggest story prompts

If your student can’t come up with an idea for what to write about, have some pictures from newspapers or magazines available to prompt them into thinking where the story occurred and what transpired in the story. For younger children, there are wordless books filled with pictures that you can share with your child while asking questions about what they think is happening to the character. 

Develop vocabulary skills

Those weekly vocabulary sheets are an important foundation for writing skills to progress. Provide support during homework to help your child pronounce, spell, and use vocabulary words correctly. Homemade flash cards are a great tool for continuing vocabulary practice over the weekend and on vacation. 

Resist the urge to interrupt

Let your child take the lead and read their story back to you. Reading aloud provides validity that what they are reading has value because it’s their story. Resist all temptation to interrupt them. When they’re done, ask relevant questions about the story they’ve told. This will help them acquire critical thinking skills in how to more clearly communicate through descriptive writing.

Discuss everyday writing

Parents can support the importance of writing by pointing out the instances where writing is used every day. Making a grocery list, filling out school forms, or sending a thank you card for a birthday present are examples of the necessity for writing in our daily routine. If your child seems to be struggling, don’t hesitate to reach out to teachers for their observations and thoughts on how you may be of help at home.

Our Orlando private school, located in the Catholic Diocese of Orlando, is committed to proclaiming the Gospel Message of Jesus Christ. We believe in teaching the whole child and want students to love learning, helping them grow into well-rounded, contributing members of society. Learn more about us by contacting us here.

Helping Your Child Develop Number Sense

Have you, or someone you know, ever said “I just don’t get math?” It’s a common sentiment for many. The feeling of not understanding numbers, how they relate to one another, or how they are connected to one another can be overwhelming. Without number sense, learning math skills can be problematic. Developing number sense as a critical thinking skill should begin early in a child’s life. Parents play an integral role in helping their child develop number sense. From teaching basic counting sequences to identifying what a number means, parents can take the first step.

3 Steps of Number Sense

  • Learning to Count

Many children begin VPK or Kindergarten with the ability to count to 10 or 20. They understand the sequence of numbers and can identify the numbers when presented. Parents can practice with children repeating sequences orally and by utilizing math manipulatives, flash cards, and other visual tools to help kids learn to identify the numerals. Use a large calendar, and have your child tell you the date. Use a number line, and ask them to identify specific numbers. Parents can introduce writing numbers to help reinforce the word and numerical connection and increase awareness of number sense.

  • Understanding Quantities

Sometimes understanding quantity skills happens simultaneously with number identification. Children develop the concept of quantities by using math manipulatives and pairing them to the number. They count 1 manipulative and place it next to the number 1, and so on. Counting out loud together helps them understand for example, that the number 4 means that 4 manipulatives is the associated quantity. Patience is key to any new skill being mastered. Click here for additional ideas, examples and activities.

  • Simple Computation

When your child has developed a number sense for identifying numbers, counting and understanding quantities they will be better-equipped to learn simple computations. Introducing the concepts of addition, 0+1=1, is where it all begins. Our Orlando Catholic School suggests the use of similar items around the home such as: clothespins, marbles, pick-up-sticks, etc. as manipulatives that can be used for simple computation. Flash cards can be homemade on index cards and used to help children identify simple equations with quantities.

Developing a strong number sense builds a sturdy footing for understanding math concepts. Children who develop a strong number sense when young will be successful in computing increasingly difficult problems as they move through each grade level. If your child is struggling to grasp the fundamentals of number sense, be patient and remember that everyone learns at a different speed, and some struggle with math more than others. If it continues to be an area of concern, reach out to your child’s teacher, and together, you can work to help your child learn.

Our Orlando private school, located in the Catholic Diocese of Orlando, is committed to proclaiming the Gospel Message of Jesus Christ. We believe in teaching the whole child and want students to love learning, helping them grow into well-rounded, contributing members of society. Learn more about us by contacting us here.

How to Celebrate Our Lady of the Rosary as a Family

The Feast of Our Lady of the Rosary is celebrated on October 7th this year. In keeping with the spirit of this special day, St. Charles Borromeo Catholic School has some creative suggestions for helping you celebrate as a family. Historically embedded in our Catholic history, this feast was originally named “Our Lady of Victory” after a 16th century battle that ended the attempted Turkish invasion of Europe. It’s said that the nation-wide Rosary prayers offered to the Virgin Mary for intercession in the war resulted in Europe’s victory. It was later changed to “The Feast of the Holy Rosary” by Pope Gregory XIII. The date has varied only slightly over the centuries, but always occurs in October.

Praying the Rosary

As practicing Catholics, we know the importance of praying the Rosary daily. Between work, getting the kids to school, homework, after-school activities, cooking, cleaning, etc. finding the time to pray as a family can be challenging. Praying the Rosary as family may seem even more impossible to schedule. We all struggle to find the time to be prayerful, to thank God for all he has blessed us with, and to adore the Virgin Mother. It’s not as difficult as you may think.

Meals

To celebrate the Feast of Our Lady of the Rosary, create a menu tailored to honoring Mary. Kids love to be creative with decorating cakes or cupcakes. Bake a Bundt cake (crown-shaped), and let them decorate with blue and white icing, symbolic of Mary. Decorate cupcakes, and arrange them to form a decade of the Rosary. Incorporate the herb rosemary, often associated with the Blessed Mother, into a recipe for the main meal. When saying your meal blessing, add the Hail Mary after.

After Dinner

If your family eats dinner at the same time every night, consider scheduling family prayer-time immediately after dinner. The whole family is gathered together; you can pray the Rosary even while cleaning up. Or take an after dinner walk each day with the family. Pray the Rosary as you walk about the neighborhood. If family prayer time is always scheduled for bedtime, it’s easy to factor in additional time to pray the Holy Rosary. There are no rules for when to pray.

In the Car

Whether on the way to or from our Orlando Catholic school, being in the car provides a great opportunity to recite the Rosary. There are even podcasts and CDs available to help keep track. (Yes, there’s also an app for this.) Visit your app store to download The Catholic Rosary. Remember, you can pray just one decade or all five as time permits.

Charitable Acts

Every Saturday is set aside in the Church for devotion to the Virgin Mary. Volunteer for a favorite charity as a family or offer your services to a specific individual in need. Let each family member designate a special intention for the Holy Rosary on that day.

With a little creativity and planning you will find the time to honor Our Lady of the Rosary as a family throughout the month of October. Praying the Rosary daily was requested by Our Lady of Fatima. Start this October by celebrating Our Lady of the Rosary as a family.

Our Orlando Catholic school, located in the Catholic Diocese of Orlando, is committed to proclaiming the Gospel Message of Jesus Christ. We believe in teaching the whole child and want students to love learning, helping them grow into well-rounded, contributing members of society. Learn more about us by contacting us here.

How to Help Your Child Stop Procrastinating

As a parent, you probably know the procrastination struggle is real! Your child waits until the last minute to start a project or homework, and they might not seem to understand the importance of doing things promptly. Getting your child ready and out the door on time can be stressful. It’s instinctive for us all to avoid doing something that gives us no joy or a task that doesn’t interest us. For children, procrastination on homework assignments or long-term projects can undermine their ability to be academically successful. Here’s how you can help your child break the procrastination cycle.

Ask why

If you ask your child why she doesn’t want to start her homework and listen to her response, you may be surprised by her answer. Children don’t have the same perception of time as adults. Students often overestimate the length of time needed to finish a task and are overwhelmed by the assignments they face. They feel it is impossible to accomplish, choosing to avoid even starting it. Time them on how long it takes to finish their spelling list, math homework, etc. Breaking the workload down into manageable chunks will help them better understand time management. 

Another reason your child may be procrastinating is fear. Some children feel that nothing they do will live up to their expectations, the teacher’s expectations, or yours. Some experience extreme anxiety, striving to be perfect. You need to talk with your child about realistic expectations and help them understand that procrastination is not the way to be successful. Don’t punish your child for this behavior; help them work through it. 

Discuss consequences

Children who procrastinate regularly tend to be very short-sighted. They may not understand that their grades can be affected by turning in assignments late or that putting off homework or chores will ultimately take away time from doing things they enjoy. Put it in terms that are meaningful to your child.

Set a schedule

Routines are important and help to define expectations for children. Establishing a designated time for homework to be done each day will help your child stop procrastinating. Build in break times so the assignments don’t overwhelm them. As an example, you can say: “Let’s get your math homework done, and then you can have a snack.” 

Remove distractions

Set the right tone for doing homework. Whether it’s at the kitchen table or a desk in their bedroom, students need to be able to concentrate on the assignment and feel that you are providing them with your support. It’s important that you not be distracted by your phone or the TV in case they need help.

Organization

The frustration of opening a backpack to find papers stuffed in, broken pencils, textbooks, etc. can make starting homework a problem for children. Help your child organize her backpack with folders designated for homework, messages from school, etc. Let her give input into what she thinks will help her stay organized. At home, ensure the homework space has the tools needed to complete assignments. This helps avoid delays in starting homework by reducing the temptation to wander toward other distractions in search of supplies. 

Praise and reward

Your child needs to know that his efforts are paying off. If he finished a project before the due date, point out how exciting it is to have free time and not be stressed about getting it done. Each time homework is finished in the allotted time, express your pride in his excellent time management skills. Reinforcement of positive behavior teaches children to set attainable goals for themselves and builds time management skills. Procrastination, however, negatively impacts their desire to succeed.

Our Orlando private school, located in the Catholic Diocese of Orlando, encourages parents to provide children with guidelines that will help them succeed during the school year and beyond. Our staff is committed to proclaiming the Gospel Message of Jesus Christ. We believe in teaching the whole child and want students to love learning, helping them grow into well-rounded, contributing members of society. Learn more about us by contacting us here.

5 Ways to Make Science Fun for Your Child

We are surrounded by the world that our Heavenly Father created for us. With the gift of man’s intelligence, we have learned to examine the smallest details of our universe. From subatomic particles to the mysteries of biology and chemistry, science is everywhere. Merriam-Webster defines science as “knowledge or a system of knowledge covering general truths or the operation of general laws especially as obtained and tested through scientific method.” How can parents help stimulate a child’s interest and make science fun when the definition is cold and clinical? Make it fun, messy, hands-on, and exciting! Here are some of our favorite ways to make science fun for children.

Keep in mind that age appropriateness is an important factor for any experiment you may choose to introduce to your child. The objective is for them to learn and have fun while doing so. Don’t select an experiment that you believe may be too detailed for them to follow, and of course, safety comes first. 

Water Tables 

Children of all ages love to play with water. Experiment with objects that sink and float! Ask your child for his observations and to make predictions about whether the next object will float or sink. Ask why. 

Fill up 5 plastic cups with water and add different food colors to each one. Let them experiment by mixing colors. The experiments with water can become as sophisticated and simulate tidal pools, depending on the containers you use.

Bubbles

The properties of bubbles make for great fun and can be messy. Most children love playing with bubbles, and by introducing different wands to make different shapes and sizes, you demonstrate facts about surface tension, gravity, and chemistry.

Baking

Baking requires exact measurements and a perfect combination of ingredients to produce a delicious result. It’s a terrific learning opportunity. Kids as young as 3 can dump in cups of flour and sugar and even crack an egg. The recipes can increase in difficulty as your child grows. Introducing the chemical reactions that occur in the baking process is chemistry in its simplest form. 

Family Adventures 

Take time out with the family, and visit your local science center for some great opportunities for hands-on exploration. Exhibits appeal to all ages and every aspect of science is there to study while having fun. If you’re looking for a more relaxing trip, take the kids to the beach and look for shells and other sea life along the shore. Have them separate the shells and then identify the type of sea creature that used it for a home. Not feeling like taking a day trip? Dig in your garden, and let your child investigate what soil is made of, icky bugs and all. 

Construction

Children love to build things. From stacking pots and pans to building ramps with boxes and watching toys slide, children are drawn to seeing how tall, wide, and strong they can make their structures. Making a ramp is a great place to start. Your child can observe how to increase the speed downhill. Change the angles of the ramps, and have them make observations and predictions about how the movement will change. Build a birdhouse together, or go kite flying together. It’s a nice way to bond while fostering a love of science. 

Science is more fun for kids when they aren’t asked to memorize formulas and facts. The more we allow them to explore and observe, the more they will appreciate how science impacts the beautiful world around them. 

Our Orlando private school, located in the Catholic Diocese of Orlando, encourages parents to provide children with guidelines that help them succeed during the school year and beyond. Our staff is committed to proclaiming the Gospel Message of Jesus Christ. We believe in teaching the whole child and want students to love learning, helping them grow into well-rounded, contributing members of society. Learn more about us by contacting us here.

How to Help Your Child Choose the Best Extracurricular Activities for School

With school now in session, the time has come to choose extracurricular activities. Finding the balance between academic time, family time, downtime and extracurricular activities can be an overwhelming task. So how do you decide the best extracurricular activities for your child?

What does your child like to do?

Our suggestion is that you ask your child what interests him. Does he enjoy sports, games, reading, music, art,  or other activities? Extracurricular activities help to develop and enhance skills outside the classroom. They are an important component of developing a well-rounded and happy student. Don’t be afraid to offer alternatives to your child when you feel they might be more successful in one activity over another. We also suggest that you encourage your child to attend introductory meetings to clubs and information nights for sports to help them understand the commitments required for the activities that interest them.

Will this activity fit into our lifestyle?

Consider the time and expense required by participation in a specific activity. Keep the following questions in mind when choosing an extracurricular activity for your child:

  • Will there be multiple practices during the week with games every weekend during the season? 
  • Is the equipment needed expensive? 
  • Does participation in this specific activity impact homework or family time? 
  • Will my child still get enough sleep? 
  • Can we provide necessary transportation to and from practices and games, club meetings, etc.? 

If you become stressed and frustrated with the time or expenses an activity requires, you will not be as supportive as you would like to be. 

Do extracurricular activities really benefit students?

Extracurricular activities provide students the opportunity to develop leadership and teamwork skills, as well as problem-solving skills. They allow your child to learn about the importance of committing to a cause. These activities also allow students to expand their circle of friends and meet people who are different from themselves. They provide students a way to explore their passions outside of the classroom. As they enter high school, participating in extracurricular activities will help build a strong resume for college applications. At the end of the day, the goal of these activities is to enhance their school experience, as well as their life outside of school. 

At our Orlando private school, located in the Catholic Diocese of Orlando, we are proud to offer a variety of extracurricular activities to our student population. Our staff is committed to proclaiming the Gospel Message of Jesus Christ. We believe in teaching the whole child and want students to love learning, helping them grow into well-rounded, contributing members of society. Learn more about us by contacting us here.

Back-to-School Prayers to Start the School Year Right

 

If you’re like most of our St. Charles Borromeo parents, you spent the last few weeks of summer vacation getting everything ready for another successful school year. From helping with homework to volunteering at school, we know the everyday demands of parenting. Another important component of preparing your children to return to campus is prayer. 

Easing Your Child’s Fears

From a child’s point of view, starting a new school year can be a source of anxiety, fear, and lack of self-confidence. Students can struggle with bullying, discrimination, and not fitting in. In addition to these social issues, children overhear what’s happening in the world, regardless of how you may try to shield them. Children today are struggling to maintain balance between these issues and being academically successful. Prayer can play an important role in helping assuage a child’s concerns. They can place their fears in the hands of Our Lord and know that He will hear and answer those prayers. 

Phillippians 4:6-7 teaches us: “Be anxious for nothing, but in everything by prayer and supplication, with thanksgiving, let your requests be made known to God; and the peace of God, which surpasses all understanding, will guard your hearts and minds through Christ Jesus.” 

As Catholics, we are reminded of the power of prayer daily. Instilling faith in prayer is one of the greatest gifts a parent can give their child. Learning how to pray isn’t difficult; neither is teaching your children to open their hearts to Jesus Christ.

Praying for a Good School Year

The prayers don’t have to be lengthy and you can encourage your children to speak to Him from their hearts. You can guide them by praying the Lord’s Prayer together first, or using one specifically written for the start of a new school year. Here’s an example:

“Heavenly Father, I pray that I will be safe going back to school. I ask you to watch over me and my family and friends. Help me to learn from my teachers. Help me to do my best in all my subjects. Please help me to be a good friend and to be kind to everyone I meet. Thank you for the blessings in my life. Amen”

For Parents and Caregivers

“Lord, I am worried about my children returning to school. The world is not in a good place right now. I ask that you wrap them in your arms and protect them from any dangers that may come their way. I also pray that they learn to be compassionate and kind and become good citizens of the world. Help them to learn their academic lessons and to utilize the gifts you bestowed upon them. In Jesus’ name. Amen”

Take time to pray and encourage your children to pray. Make praying together an important part of your family routine now and you will find the time to continue throughout the year. Our Orlando Catholic school, located in the Catholic Diocese of Orlando, encourages parents to provide children with activities to help stimulate them over the summer. Our staff is committed to proclaiming the Gospel Message of Jesus Christ. We believe in teaching the whole child and want students to love learning, helping them grow into well-rounded, contributing members of society. Learn more about us by contacting us here.