Gardening With Genesis 1:29


The very first foods mentioned in the Bible came from the Garden of Eden. Adam and Eve ate the ideal diet of plant foods given to them by God.
Genesis 1:29 says “ God also said: See, I give you every seed-bearing plant on all the earth and every tree that has seed-bearing fruit on it to be your foodCatholic schools in Orlando explain the importance of plant foods, its connection to the Scripture, and how you can start your very own garden.

Garden of Eden
The very first diet given to us consisted of plants. A plant-based meal includes fruits, vegetables, grains, legumes, and more. These foods are very often known to be very nutritious and help your child live a longer life. But skip purchasing them at the grocery store — instead, create your own garden at home!


Starting Your Own Garden
Starting your own little Garden of Eden with your little one is a great way to bond and save money on groceries. Getting their little hands dirty is rewarding. But knowing where to begin is difficult. Start small and then let it grow. 

Choose a Spot
First, pick a spot in the yard. All vegetables need up to eight hours of sunlight per day. The space must be flat because it’s both not easy and more time-consuming to work with a sloping garden. 

Clear the Sod and Work the Soil
Once you find your spot, clear the ground by getting rid of the sod covering the area. The more fertile the soil is, the better your food will grow. Residential soil usually needs a boost, so add organic matter, such as compost, dry grass clippings, or decayed leaves. Work the soil by tilling and digging

Choose Your Veggies
Head to your local garden store and start shopping! Choose plants that can adapt to your soil, sunlight, and climate. Here are a few great plants for beginners:

  • Peppers
  • Tomatoes
  • Lettuce
  • Cucumbers


Research which fruits and vegetables tolerate what temperatures. For instance, tomatoes prefer warmer temperatures, whereas kale tolerates the cold. Once they grow, there’s no greater feeling. Imagine the smile on your child’s face when he accomplishes this great goal! Now it’s time to eat!

St. Charles Borromeo, one of the Catholic schools in Orlando, is more than just a place to learn; it’s a community. Our staff is committed to proclaiming the Gospel Message of Jesus Christ. We believe in teaching the whole child and want students to love learning, helping them grow into well-rounded, contributing members of society. Learn more about us by contacting us here.

Having Dinner as a Family Can Help Your Child Develop

We know life can get busy. Work is calling your name. You stayed at your job late and couldn’t make it home for dinner. But St. Charles Borromeo, one of the best private schools in Orlando, highly encourages setting aside time to have dinner with your family. Family dinners are an important part of your child’s development. Shared family time at the dinner table is an important aspect of family life.

Boosts Development
Sharing dinner at the table boosts your child development. For one, it assists in promoting language skills when you talk to them about her day. Secondly, it allows them to develop patience and dexterity by using utensils. Additionally, social skills can develop through manners and taking turns. 

More Nutritious
Researchers have found that sharing meals together on a regular basis is more nutritious and leads you to make better food choices. Families who eat together are more likely to eat their servings of fruits and vegetables than families who don’t eat together. Your child is less likely to graze on junk food and would actually prefer the healthy stuff. Not to mention, it helps make weight control easier! Because home-cooked meals are healthier than restaurant meals, your young child will likely be in better physical shape.

Creates Bonds
Being all together in one place, like at the dinner table, allows your family to feel a strong bond with one another. You don’t want your family to lead disconnected lives at work and school, so here’s a way to reconnect. Ask your child how their day went, and it’ll teach them to ask you the same. 

Improved Mental Health and Grades
Studies have found that children who enjoy family meals are less likely to be depressed and more likely to do well academically. It’s been reported that the more often you eat as a family, the more likely it is that your child will receive As and Bs.

St. Charles Borromeo, one of the best private schools in Orlando, is more than just a place to learn; it’s a community. Our staff is committed to proclaiming the Gospel Message of Jesus Christ. We believe in teaching the whole child and want students to love learning, helping them grow into well-rounded, contributing members of society. Learn more about us by contacting us here.

The Benefits of Band and Choir

At St. Charles Borromeo, one of the best Catholic schools in Orlando, we highly encourage students to participate in band and choir. These classes have many benefits for your child, including making a connecting between spirituality and music. Here’s why your child should join the school’s band or choir!

Making Connections
Sometimes making friends at school is hard. By joining classes like band and choir, your child is able to interact with her peers and build friendships. In doing so, it also encourages teamwork. Band and choir teach teamwork skills, according to the National Association of Music Parents. When she’s performing, your child and her new friends come together and collaborate their individual talents. Being able to work with others is a skill that your child will take beyond school, making it useful in future careers and relationships.

Happy Brain, Happy Child
Playing music helps children and teenagers make new neurological connections. When your child listens to the music he plays, dopamine is released in his brain. Music releases powerful emotions. There is a pleasure that comes from listening to music you enjoy, identify with, or find familiar, such as when a certain song is linked to a memory. When your child is among her new friends — singing or playing music — it will induce a shared emotional experience. This experience should help your child be more excited about going to school and feel happier overall. These feelings have been known to lead to better grades!

Music and Religion
Music is a part of religion. Music, in its purest sense, is religion — and vice versa! Let us remember: After escaping from the Egyptians, the people of Israel sang a song to the Lord (Exod. 15). The tune, “Song of the Sea,” is linked to Israel’s passing through the sea. Music is the universal language of the soul and a code of life. So as far back as we can read in the Bible, music was there. What better way to bring your child closer to God?

St. Charles Borromeo, one of the Catholic schools in Orlando, is more than just a place to learn; it’s a community. Our staff is committed to proclaiming the Gospel Message of Jesus Christ. We believe in teaching the whole child and want students to love learning, helping them grow into well-rounded, contributing members of society. Learn more about us by contacting us here.

Back-to-School Organization

Back-to-school season can be chaotic and stressful. Taking the time to implement organizational tactics in advance can help calm the storm. These tips from St. Charles Borromeo, an Orlando Catholic school, will help the transition back to school smoother.

Build a Workstation
To keep your children motivated, designate a work area where they feel comfortable and focused. Allowing them to do their homework anywhere can lead to bad habits and lack of commitment. Don’t allow games, television, phones, or snacks at their desk.

Create a Calendar
Create a calendar or command station that lists schedules, class assignments, lunch menus, after-school activities, meetings, and more. All you need is a dry erase board and some creativity. Color code each family member’s activity, and use large enough boxes to list all tasks. Place it in a central location in your home, such as the kitchen where families spend a lot of their time. 

Regain Routine
Say goodbye to the lazy days of summer before school actually starts. Ease your children back into a routine before school actually starts by having them go to bed early and set alarms in the morning. Gradually phasing into the school schedule will make the start of the new year easier. Talk to them about it prior to school starting so they can know what to expect and maybe even get excited. Do a run-through of the schedule a week before school starts and smooth out any trouble areas.

Positive Preparation
Create good habits that avoid the morning madness. Teach your children to lay out their clothing the night before, and pack lunches and fill their water bottles. Go the extra mile by tagging the clothes and food for each day of the week. Create a send-off station by the front door where keys, backpacks, music instruments, and other items are ready to go the next day. 

St. Charles Borromeo, an Orlando Catholic school, is more than just a place to learn; it’s a community. Our staff is committed to proclaiming the Gospel Message of Jesus Christ. We believe in teaching the whole child and want students to love learning, helping them grow into well-rounded, contributing members of society. Learn more about us by contacting us here.

Summertime Service Ideas

Summer is a great opportunity to get into the spirit of giving. Volunteering as a family shows your children how to make a difference, and it will make them feel good. St. Charles Borromeo, an Orlando Catholic school, has a list of ways to give back to the community this summer.

Fill Grocery Bags With Food
Gather non-perishable items and place them in reusable grocery bags your family decorated. Hunger projects encourage team building and strengthen bonds. Feeding America has a food bank locator to find a drop-off location.

Bundle Blessing Bags for the Homeless
Orlando Union Rescue Mission has an excellent guide to creating care packages for those in need. Even the simplest care kits can go a long way for a homeless person. Fill it up with the essentials, such as toothpaste, deodorant, socks, brushes, and snacks. Donating the items with your child gives them a lasting impression.

Do Yard Work
There is probably an elderly person in your neighborhood that can’t do their own yard work. This is a good opportunity for your child to develop work skills and encourage them to care for the elderly. Recruit a team of your child’s friends, so he feels more encouraged to do it and see it as fun. Have them work as a team with assigned tasks — shoveling and weeding, mowing the lawn, and raking the leaves.

Adopt a Family
Adopting a family for the holidays instills a sense of kindness, giving, and faith in your children. After you apply, you’ll be matched with a recipient — a low-income child or family who needs resources. Brainstorm gift ideas with your family once you learn of the child’s specifics, such as age and gender. Then, it’s time to go shopping! Contact the local Catholic Charities to find your match.

Help an Animal Shelter
This should be an easy activity for those who already have pets, and it teaches your children how to be responsible for them! Visit your local animal shelter to assist with walking the dogs, cleaning the cages and litter boxes, and just playing with the animals. Donations are always appreciated as well if you want to go the extra mile.

When you’re done, discuss what you did, how it made your family feel, and what they learned. Build their enthusiasm and let them choose which service project they want to do next time!

St. Charles Borromeo, an Orlando Catholic school, is more than just a place to learn; it’s a community. Our staff is committed to proclaiming the Gospel Message of Jesus Christ. We believe in teaching the whole child and want students to love learning, helping them grow into well-rounded, contributing members of society. Learn more about us by contacting us here.

Stay Learning This Summer

Summer vacation is here, but you don’t have to leave the learning behind! St. Charles Borromeo, an Orlando Catholic school, has tips to help keep your child learning all summer long.

At-Home Theatre Time
No need to go out to see a theatre show — make your very own play at home! Creating their own play can get their creative juices flowing by developing stories that the finger puppets act out. Children can create puppets by cutting off the finger-ends of old gloves, then by drawing a face on them with felt-tip markers and gluing on yarn for hair. They can create animal faces, such as cats and dogs.

Start Writing
Give your children postcards so they can write to you about their summer adventures. Provide them with a journal to write diary entries, poetry, recipes, or to scrapbook. They can also blog! Edublogs and Kidblog offer free blog spaces that have appropriate security. Blogging can help them build research and writing skills.

Build Vocabulary with a Word Jar
Word jars can help build your child’s vocabulary skills. Fill a jar with pieces of paper that have a word on each one. Let your child draw a word every day, and ask them to define it. Challenge them to use that word in conversations throughout the day. Adapt the activity to their grade level.

Count with Ice Cream
Children may not love math, but they love ice cream! Incorporate a sweet treat into their math games. Gather small pom poms of different colors and write numbers on triangles. Your child will stack “ice cream scoops” into each cone according to its number, counting as they go. Treat them to real ice cream once they masters their counting skills!

Treasure Hunt at a Museum
Your child may not be excited to visit a museum, so take your visit one exhibit at a time. When you visit, do not try seeing everything in one day. Start by visiting the gift shop and allowing your child to pick out some postcards of paintings or objects in the museum. Try to incorporate periods of history they have learned at school. Then, have them walk through the museum and treasure hunt those items in the postcards!

St. Charles Borromeo, an Orlando Catholic school, is more than just a place to learn; it’s a community. Our staff is committed to proclaiming the Gospel Message of Jesus Christ. We believe in teaching the whole child and want students to love learning, helping them grow into well-rounded, contributing members of society. Learn more about us by contacting us here.

How to Prepare for Summer Camp

If you registered your children for summer camp, you may be feeling apprehensive about them being on their own. St. Charles Borromeo, an Orlando Catholic school, has the tips you need to prepare for summer camp and to ensure your children have the best experience ever.

Talk About It
Get your children excited about camp by sharing your own childhood camp experiences or involving them in the planning process. Read the brochures and websites together, and show them some of the experiences they can look forward to. By focusing on the positive, you are reducing their anxiety.

Pack Sentimental Items
Pack one or two gentle reminders from home, such as a teddy bear or a family photograph, to make them feel comfortable while away.

Inform the Camp Director of Any Medical Concerns
Before you send your children off, make sure you get their physical exam. Let the camp director know in advance about any allergies or medical concerns. If it’s a chronic condition, consider a camp that is specific to your child’s needs.

No Sharing
Remind your children not to share brushes, hats, or helmets during their camp stay. Let them know they can get lice from sharing.

Label
Label everything you are sending your children to camp with. The children rarely stay organized at camp, and they can mix their stuff up with their tent mates. In a big pile of clothes, it’s easier to sort if the clothing has their name on it. For younger campers, try color coding!

Keep Goodbyes Short and Sweet
Get them settled in and be on your way! Long, emotional goodbyes can increase your child’s anxiety. As difficult as it is, giving them a quick kiss, hug, and promise to be in touch is better for their transition into camper mode.

Prepare for Homesickness
Your child may feel homesickness during camp. Reassure them it’s common, especially for first-time campers. Leading up to their getaway, let them know that being sad and having emotions is both normal and healthy and that the staff is there to help.

Make Communication Positive and Easy
Become your child’s pen pal. Pack notecards, envelopes, and stamps and give them a schedule for phone calls and emails. Explain to them how easy it is to contact you, and that they should share the good and the bad. In the event you receive a negative correspondence, it is days old and your child is most likely in a happier place now. Reply back in a positive, upbeat way.

St. Charles Borromeo, an Orlando Catholic school, is more than just a place to learn; it’s a community. Our staff is committed to proclaiming the Gospel Message of Jesus Christ. We believe in teaching the whole child and want students to love learning, helping them grow into well-rounded, contributing members of society. Learn more about us by contacting us here.

The Value of Family Vacations

With summer vacation right around the corner, family vacations are coming up as well — and you don’t need to take an extravagant trip to Hawaii or Europe to benefit from family time. Family vacations create lasting memories and offer a fun escape from reality. Take a look at the ways you and your kids can benefit from taking a vacation together!

Learn From Other Cultures
By spending time immersed in other cultures, your children become more empathetic, open-minded, and respectful and appreciative of cultural differences. They see firsthand how other people live and expand their understanding of the world around them.

Recharge
Family vacations are the perfect way to forget about work and school and just focus on your family and having a great time. When you share this relaxed time together, you build relationships and develop stronger bonds.

Happiness Anchors
According to research done by the Family Holiday Association, family vacations can act as “happiness anchors.” This means that happy memories refresh us by taking us back to cheerful times, allowing us to approach problems with a fresh perspective. Of those surveyed, 49% said their happiest memory was a family vacation, and a third of the respondents said that they can still vividly recall vacations when they were a child. A quarter of respondents said they reflect on these joyful memories to get through tough times.

Quality Time
As you conquer new adventures, unfamiliar cultures, or the tallest roller coaster in the theme park, you spend time together as a family. You get the chance to learn more about each other in a new environment and have uninterrupted conversations.

The Planning Process
Take time to watch shows on your destination, research popular stops, and activities, and read about the most-loved local spots. The excitement and anticipation of planning your trip will help you push through your daily work day and give you something to look forward to!

St. Charles Borromeo, an Orlando Catholic school, is more than just a place to learn; it’s a community. Our staff is committed to proclaiming the Gospel Message of Jesus Christ. We believe in teaching the whole child and want students to love learning, helping them grow into well-rounded, contributing members of society. Learn more about us by contacting us here.

Get a Little Greener for Earth Day

As Earth Day gets closer, it’s the perfect opportunity to talk to your family about how we can take small steps every day to protect the environment. From grocery shopping to traveling, it’s easy to conserve energy and resources. Take a look at these creative tips to go a little greener every day:

Shop smarter: Purchase from businesses that support eco-friendly and fair trade practices. Don’t be afraid to read labels and ask how something was made or what an ingredient is. Your weekly Publix trip isn’t just a chance to check off your grocery list; it’s a chance to show what you want to see more of in the market.

Proper disposal: If you have chemical-heavy items such as used batteries, old cell phones, or paint thinner, Earth911 can help you find locations near you that accept and recycle all sorts of materials.

Cleaning products: Rather than using paper products to clean, opt for sponges, washcloths, and towels, which are less expensive, reusable, and easily disinfected with hot water. Baking soda and vinegar are also great non-toxic, budget-friendly options! If the vinegar smell bothers you, follow it up with a bit of lemon juice.

The stove: When you use a lid to cover a pot on the stove, you not only boil your water faster, but you can reduce your energy by up to two-thirds. And if you’re able to prepare multiple foods in the same pot, you can save energy as well.

Get recycling: If you go to the America Recycles Day website, you can enter your zip code and join a community-wide recycling event close to you.

Pest repellents: Did you know that coffee grounds are an easy eco-friendly alternative to pest repellents? Sprinkle these around ant-prone areas and you’ll reap the benefits without suffering from toxic fumes.

Use rainwater: Create a simple, DIY rainwater harvesting system to collect water run-off for your lawn and garden. All it takes if a 50-gallon barrel, a filtering screen, and a spigot. You can collect up to 150 gallons with every rainstorm!

When traveling: If you don’t wash your sheets and towels every day at home, why should you do it when you’re traveling? Leave the “Do Not Disturb” sign on your hotel room door to prevent the housekeeping staff from cleaning your room every day, which will help conserve cleaning supplies, water, and electricity.

Power strip: Unplug your electronics when they’re not in use. If it takes too much time to unplug each device manually, use a power strip that can turn off multiple devices at once.

St. Charles Borromeo, a private school in Orlando, is more than just a place to learn; it’s a community. Our staff is committed to proclaiming the Gospel Message of Jesus Christ. We believe in teaching the whole child and want students to love learning, helping them grow into well-rounded, contributing members of society. Learn more about us by contacting us here.

 

The Importance of Holy Saturday

The Easter season and Holy Week are sacred, important times of the year. It’s an opportunity for us to remember the last week that Jesus spent walking on Earth and prepare our hearts for His return. Each day of Holy Week is special, and by understanding the importance of Holy Saturday, we can fully appreciate the sacrifice He made for us.

What Happened on the First Holy Saturday?
Holy Saturday is a day of both joy and sadness as we reminisce on the day that Jesus laid in the tomb. Luke 23:56 mentions that the women returned home “and prepared spices and ointments. On the Sabbath they rested according to the commandment.” Pontius Pilate instructed guards to be posted at the tomb to ensure that the disciples wouldn’t steal His body.

The History
This was the only Saturday on which fasting was permitted in the early days of the Church. In the second century, people fasted for the entirety of the 40-hour period between nightfall on Good Friday and dawn on Easter Sunday. In the reign of Constantine in the fourth century, the tradition of the vigil began.

At dusk, the vigil began with the lighting of the “new fire,” which included a large number of lamps and candles and the Paschal candle. The Paschal candle is made of white wax, marked with a cross and an alpha and omega, and represents leading people out of the darkness and into the celebration of the Easter vigil.

What Happens at the Easter Vigil?
When we celebrate Holy Saturday with the Easter Vigil Mass, we meditate on God’s good works and thank Him for the price Jesus paid. In the early church, Holy Saturday and the vigil of Pentecost were the only days baptism was administered. While we don’t follow that now, the Easter Vigil Mass is still an important night for those who have spent months of preparation to be received through Baptism and Confirmation into the Church.

St. Charles Borromeo, an Orlando Catholic school, is more than just a place to learn; it’s a community. Our staff is committed to proclaiming the Gospel Message of Jesus Christ. We believe in teaching the whole child and want students to love learning, helping them grow into well-rounded, contributing members of society. Learn more about us by contacting us here.