5 Tips for Summer Water Safety

pool lifeguard water safety

When the weather heats up, it’s natural for children to want to take a dip in the water to cool off. While most adults can easily find their way through bodies of water, children need a little extra help. Drowning is a serious concern, especially when children find their way into water without supervision. Here are our recommendations for keeping your child safe around water this summer.

Pay Attention

In a perfect world, every pool and beach would have attentive lifeguards on duty at all times. However, this simply isn’t the case. Whenever your child gets in the water, whether it’s an inflatable pool or an ocean, stay vigilant. Make sure you know your child’s location and pay attention to how they’re handling the water. If you have a pool in your home and can’t find your child, check the pool first. Paying attention to your child’s swimming habits could save their life.

swimming children in pool with sunglasses

No Swimming Alone

When you’re busy and your child wants to go swimming, you may be tempted to let them go alone. However, anything from cramps to overconfidence in swimming ability can create a dangerous situation. See if they can find a buddy to go to the pool with if you’re not able to go. While a friend or sibling may not be as strong as an adult, they can at least call for help. Tell your child and their buddy who to call in the case of an emergency.

Swim Lessons

One way to help your child stay safe is by teaching them how to swim. By taking swimming lessons, your child learns how to stay afloat and hold their own in the water. Swim instructors make sure your child swims with proper form and technique. Lessons alone will not keep your child safe from harm, but they can help your child confidently navigate the waters under normal circumstances. No child is too young to learn to start swimming; even infants can take water exposure classes and get familiar with bodies of water.

boy with life jacket paddle boarding on lake

Life Jackets

When your child is just learning how to swim or going on an outdoor adventure near the water, wearing a life jacket can quite literally save their life. These are especially important when riding on boats or going near large bodies of water where it’s not always easy to keep track of your child. Children are naturally curious, which can get them into trouble. Life jackets aren’t a substitute for watching your child; they are an added layer of protection. Floaties can help children who are just learning to swim but are not replacements for life jackets.

Know What to Do in an Emergency

Telling your child what to do in an emergency can help keep them safe. However, it’s equally important that you know what to do if something goes wrong. Here’s what you should do in the event of an emergency:

  • Alert the lifeguard if one is available to help.
  • If no lifeguard is present, remove the person from the water if you can do so without putting yourself in harm’s way.
  • Ask someone to call emergency services. If you’re alone, provide 2 minutes of care, then call. 
  • Use rescue breathing, CPR and an AED if available.
  • Signs a swimmer needs help: 
    • They’re not moving forward in the water.
    • They’re vertical in the water and can’t move.
    • They’re motionless and face down in the water.

During summer break, children in Florida naturally gravitate toward the water. It’s important to keep them safe when they do. At St. Charles Borromeo, teachers work hard to guide students toward academic and spiritual growth. Our Orlando private school located in the Catholic Diocese of Orlando is more than just a place to learn; it’s a community. Our staff is committed to proclaiming the Gospel Message of Jesus Christ. We believe in teaching the whole child and want students to love learning, helping them grow into well-rounded, contributing members of society. Learn more about us by contacting us here.

Support a Local Orlando Business on National Ice Cream Day

ice cream cone with pink background

Ice cream is essential for getting through Florida summers, especially for kids (and kids at heart)! On National Ice Cream Day — Sunday, July 18th — ice cream shops go all out with special flavors and deals. One great way to celebrate this holiday is by supporting local businesses here in Orlando. Here are a few great options that aren’t far from our Orlando private school: 

The Greenery Creamery 

The Greenery Creamery, an Asian-owned ice cream shop, calls itself “Orlando’s first artisanal ice cream boutique.” With a variety of locally sourced dairy and plant-based ice cream options, you’re sure to find flavors you and your child enjoy. If you have adventurous taste, this is the place to go. While flavors like sweet cream and cookies and cream can be found, there are also options like guava, blueberry lavender and black ash coconut. You can find this shop at their original Downtown Orlando location or at their newer location in Downtown Sanford. 

 

 

woman in pink apron handing ice cream cone

Kelly’s Homemade Ice Cream 

Another great handcrafted option in Orlando is Kelly’s Homemade Ice Cream, with locations in Audubon Park, Fern Creek and Oviedo. All of their ice cream is handmade in Orlando. This ice cream shop offers classic flavors like chocolate and strawberry, as well as fun flavors like maple bourbon bacon and rose almond pistachio. In addition to their staple flavors, they have a rotating special menu that includes non-dairy options. 

ice cream in bins

Sperry Deli & Creamery 

Named after Orlando Mayor Frank Ezra Sperry, who served in the early 1900s, Sperry Deli & Creamery recently opened in Thornton Park near Lake Eola. This deli serves Boars Head products and a variety of ice cream flavors. Most of the flavors fall under the typical ice cream shop repertoire. Along with ice cream shop favorites like vanilla, chocolate, cookies and cream and cookie dough, they offer sorbets and low-fat flavors. This is a great place to go if you’re looking for a plain and simple ice cream experience.

purple popsicles on pink background

The Pop Parlour 

While The Pop Parlor is not an ice cream shop per se, their popsicles are perfect for cooling down on a summer day. Along with homemade popsicles, they offer specialty coffee drinks and tea, so there’s something for everyone. Like The Greenery Creamery and Sperry Deli & Creamery, The Pop Parlor started in Downtown Orlando, right next to Lake Eola. It has since expanded to UCF and will soon be opening a Texas location. 

At St. Charles Borromeo, we emphasize the importance of service to the community, which includes supporting small businesses. Teachers work hard to guide students toward academic and spiritual growth. Our Orlando private school located in the Catholic Diocese of Orlando is more than just a place to learn; it’s a community. Our staff is committed to proclaiming the Gospel Message of Jesus Christ. We believe in teaching the whole child and want students to love learning, helping them grow into well-rounded, contributing members of society. Learn more about us by contacting us here.

Motivating Children and Teens During Summer Break

teen girl having waffles for breakfast

School’s out for summer, and suddenly there seem to be infinite hours to fill. Some children try to sleep the boredom away, while others look forward to spending quality time with their screens. Keeping children and teens motivated during summer break may feel like a chore, it’s far from impossible. Just like adults, children sometimes just need an extra push to get motivated. Here are our recommendations. 

Decide on a Daily Schedule

Planning out a child’s entire summer will be met with groans. However, it’s important to keep them on a regular daily routine. Setting approximate wake-up times, mealtimes and bedtimes can keep them on track without being overbearing. Make sure the times are age appropriate, keeping in mind that teenagers naturally stay up longer and go to sleep later. See if you can incorporate physical activity each day, even if it’s just a short walk. Try to find a balance between structured activities and downtime. This will help your child keep up healthy habits while still giving them a much-needed summer break.

dart board with dart on outside

Help Them Set Goals

Setting goals is essential to staying motivated. Your goals for summer might be to lose a few pounds, read a few books or clean up the cluttered garage. Consider goals for your child that will keep them focused on the future. For younger children, goals like reading at the next grade’s reading level or learning a new sport would be great. For teens, maybe this is the summer they learn to drive or get their first summer job. Help your child set actionable goals, and walk them through the steps to complete them. 

Try a Summer Job or Volunteering

Whether it’s paid or unpaid, working in a structured environment is a great opportunity for older children and teens. It gives them a purpose when they’re not going to class every day. Working helps improve communication skills, build work ethic and develop leadership skills. Either type of job will look great on a college application or resume. If your child has passions for certain causes, help them find volunteer opportunities. If they’re looking to fund hobbies, a paid summer job may be a better fit.

happy young family outside

Plan for Family Time

Whether you’re keeping it local or traveling to see other family members, spending time with your child will help them focus. Come up with screen-free plans and outdoor activities everyone can do together. Make sure to keep your child posted and, if they’re interested, see if they want to be involved in the planning. Activities like camping, riding bikes or going to the park, pool, beach together can be fun and safe to do as a family. 

At St. Charles Borromeo, teachers work hard to guide students toward academic and spiritual growth. Our Orlando private school located in the Catholic Diocese of Orlando is more than just a place to learn; it’s a community. Our staff is committed to proclaiming the Gospel Message of Jesus Christ. We believe in teaching the whole child and want students to love learning, helping them grow into well-rounded, contributing members of society. Learn more about us by contacting us here.